Author Topic: R.F.C. Pilot & Trophy 1917 vignette WIP  (Read 22367 times)

Offline phs Paddy

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Re: R.F.C. Pilot & Trophy 1917 vignette WIP
« Reply #105 on: May 29, 2012, 11:43:44 AM »
Looks superb, Paddy.  :o
You're doing a great job.

BVB

Thank you very much for that Lord Buckles. The nice things you chaps have been posting really
help to keep the old fire going.   :)

Paddy
In mathematics you don't understand things, you just get use to them. Johann von Neumann 1903-1957

Offline phs Paddy

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Re: R.F.C. Pilot & Trophy 1917 vignette WIP
« Reply #106 on: May 29, 2012, 11:57:29 AM »
Just so I understand Paddy; you airbrushed a shade of Tamiya brown and then used a brush to lay in the base colour? I ask, because I'm seeing a very effective (and subtle I might add) contrast between the two shades of brown. It looks exactly like a well worn, discoloured leather jacket to me, just as it stands. This paint job looks very, very realistic!

Do you have any closeups of the jacket? This is something I'd like to try to replicate.

Cheers,

Chris

Thanks for that Chris.

The jacket only has the first base layer of Vallejo 871 Leather Brown brushed on over the top of the sub-base of airbrush applied Tamiya XF-59 Desert Yellow. There will be two more layers of Leather Brown applied to even out the base coat and then start the highlights and shadows. Let me get the right arm attached and those segments done first if you donít mind and then weíll get a close up of the jacket if you like. The jacket is on the rough side (spotty as in take a look at the left shoulder area which is very dark) as it now stands although it does give the beginning of a worn appearance as you describe and thatís what weíre in hopes of accomplishing. 

The airbrushing of a sub-base with a different tone as noted above helps give the brushed colour a subtle boost that you can control with the number of base coats you brush on and the amount of thinning you use in them. The neat thing, at least as Iíve experienced, is the surprise you get as you brush the first base coat over the airbrushed sub-base and to this point has always been pleasing making you feel that you have bumped into something quite unique.  :) Fun stuff.

Cheers,
Paddy

P.S. Someone trained as an artist would probably be rolling on the floor by now after reading this.
In mathematics you don't understand things, you just get use to them. Johann von Neumann 1903-1957

Offline keith_christie

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Re: R.F.C. Pilot & Trophy 1917 vignette WIP
« Reply #107 on: May 29, 2012, 04:28:26 PM »
Hi Paddy,

Really nice work again with the figure. it is really starting to come together now.
With regards to the Alclad primers they have not had a great press. A lot of people complain that they will not set properly, perhaps this is what you are experiencing?

Do you know if this figure is still available anywhere? I have been trying to track one down for my collection, but have not had any luck yet.

I'm looking forward to seeing the next phases.
Best Regards

Keith

Offline phs Paddy

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Re: R.F.C. Pilot & Trophy 1917 vignette WIP
« Reply #108 on: May 29, 2012, 10:08:54 PM »
Keith, sometime back I had found one on e-Bay and almost bid on it. Wish I had now. Iíve just returned from a new search and not getting any hits but Iíll keep trying and if I do find one Iíll send you a PM. Iíve even check the dealer I purchased mine from but he doesnít list it anymore. Iíll get an e-mail off to him and also post a note on a figure forum that I log into on occasion.

Thanks again for your input. I appreciate it.

Paddy
In mathematics you don't understand things, you just get use to them. Johann von Neumann 1903-1957

Offline keith_christie

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Re: R.F.C. Pilot & Trophy 1917 vignette WIP
« Reply #109 on: May 31, 2012, 04:07:27 PM »
Paddy thanks very much.

Best Regards

Keith

Offline Pete Nottingham

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Re: R.F.C. Pilot & Trophy 1917 vignette WIP
« Reply #110 on: June 01, 2012, 02:11:12 AM »
When you think about it Paddy, his leather jacket would be patchy, covered in castor oil and dust and grime.

Cheers

Pete.

Offline GHE

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using an airbrush to paint uniforms
« Reply #111 on: September 25, 2012, 06:55:19 AM »
Dear all !
Over here in the Bavarian Army Museum at Audi-Town Ingolstadt there is an annual contest on figure painting
called "Duke of Bavaria" (Napoleon I made the Wittelsbachers kings not until 1806...).
They show figures painted by masters a la Sheperd Paine , too.
It is very revealing to see those live and one literally falls to one's knees...
The most important thing in painting to modelers is the re-creation of texture. In our digitalized world dozens of people
in movie production are specialized in creating texture via computer.
It is demanding to succeed in showing surfaces according to the material they are made of: leather, cloth, metal etc. .
This may be more important than closing in on they exact hue.
As we all have noticed day in - day out: we are able to judge the material from surface reflection, we feel it much more than
we actually see it.
Uniforms are a matt theme and they are worn out by washing and sun rays.
Often one notices figures (in diorama / vignette photos)  with a sheen . That is no good. Looks like plastic toy soldiers.
As I experimented with Tamiya acrylics I once put in to the colour a good dose of matt base.
This almost does what in the heyday of Punk music was done to jeans with toilet cleaners.
But without an overdose gives a nice worn out and deadly matt surface.
Shades are made by pre-painting the figure in a darker hue of a different but matching colour or by the same but darker hue.
So you can even use your trusty  airbrush with uniform painting.
With Humbrol enamels one gets a deadly matt look by taking paint out of the can with a toothstick and thinning it with petrol
/gas that you use for cigarette lighters.
If you paint , for example boots matt black with enamels, you may polish them afterward with a Q-tip to get a sheen.
This can be done with other leather items or metal items, too , like  a canteen or a barrel of a  carbine.
But the hardest part always is human skin.
A painter ofte uses a blue priming under skin colour (veins) - didn't test it yet.

viele GrŁŖe, Gunther
LZeppelin rocks!

Offline GHE

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Re: R.F.C. Pilot & Trophy 1917 vignette WIP
« Reply #112 on: September 28, 2012, 02:53:33 AM »
Messieurs !

What I forgot ot mention: the vignette is an eye-catcher.
The story immediately unfolds.

Gunther
LZeppelin rocks!