Author Topic: Rigging For Everyone  (Read 5515 times)

Offline Bughunter

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 407
Re: Rigging For Everyone
« Reply #60 on: February 09, 2018, 06:55:55 AM »
I'm thinking for the models I'm working on right now (a 1/48th Eduard Nieuport 16 and a DML/Dragon 1/48th Fokker DVII) the EZ-Line method would probably be best.  Plus it just seems to be simpler for a beginner.
For 1/48 EZ-line is not that good option, because it is more flat, not round. So I use it in 1/48 as representation of the flat RAF-wires of British aircrafts. For others I use also such flexible "rubber", but more round one.

In general, you have to find your own way!
There are a lot of hobbies: sports, traveling ... You selected modeling.
There are also a lot of kits: car, bikes, tanks - You selected aircrafts.
There are a lot of aircraft kits: jets, airlines, sports - You selected biplanes.
There are a lot of rigging option .... You see? It is YOUR decision!

So I suggest to view the gallery of finished models of your intended scale here, see what you like (with or without turnbuckles for example).
Then look for build report of that models, see how the rigging was done in detail and use that as starting point. Try it out and check if the method works for you. Modify it for your needs/tools/whatever.

Good luck and happy rigging,
Frank
Wikipedia says: A model is a simplified representation of reality.
So I create downscaled originals.

Offline KirkH

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 34
Re: Rigging For Everyone
« Reply #61 on: February 09, 2018, 01:03:00 PM »
"In general, you have to find your own way!
There are a lot of hobbies: sports, traveling ... You selected modeling.
There are also a lot of kits: car, bikes, tanks - You selected aircrafts.
There are a lot of aircraft kits: jets, airlines, sports - You selected biplanes.
There are a lot of rigging option .... You see? It is YOUR decision!"

Thanks for pointing out the obvious.  I thought this page in the forum was for people looking for help with rigging.  If you're just going to tell me to go away and decide for myself then that defeats the purpose of this page.  Anybody can make a decisions by themselves.  My goal is to try and make an EDUCATED decision.  Sorry to have bothered you.

Online krow113

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 137
Re: Rigging For Everyone
« Reply #62 on: February 09, 2018, 02:25:33 PM »
Easy now boys!
One thing I will do when pondering procedure is to go to the beginning.
In this case I suggest a review of Des' tutorials :
https://www.ww1aircraftmodels.com/
This is 'Genesis Source Material' gentlemen.

Offline Bughunter

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 407
Re: Rigging For Everyone
« Reply #63 on: February 09, 2018, 08:17:58 PM »
My goal is to try and make an EDUCATED decision.  Sorry to have bothered you.
Sorry, if my answer sound THAT hard!
But you will get different answers, and still have to decide. That's why my second part of the answer points to the build reports. I create here very detailed build reports to answer questions like this, as man other members. So there you will find detailed explanations of different way, better than one could explain here in words. Thats why the second part of my answer.

Have fun,
Frank
Wikipedia says: A model is a simplified representation of reality.
So I create downscaled originals.

Offline hiddeous1973

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 214
  • Don't worry, Baldrick has a cunning plan !!
Re: Rigging For Everyone
« Reply #64 on: February 09, 2018, 10:56:36 PM »
I did not think any answer was hard or anything.

But to answer the question, in truth any form of turnbuckle is actually out of proportion.
Even the very fine Gaspatch versions are way to large for their scale and most people (including me) tend to use the 1/48 version for some if not all 1/32 planes or connections.
Mixing them gives a nice result also, larger 1/32 turnbuckles for rigging and 1/48 versions for the control cables to mention only 1 of many possiblities.

That leaves a problem for the 1/48 builders (which i am also) as there is no 1/72 version to fall back on!
I tend to use the 1/48 Gaspatch version because I like the looks, but in that scale any form of turrnbuckle would look out of scale with the exception of a very fine tube slipped naked over a wire.

When you look at period photo's, many of the wires and their connections are hard to see, even in fairly close-up pictures. So That would mean a very small wire and a very small turnbuckle...

So I comprimise.... I like visable turnbuckles so I use them and I use a wire that is not too small in comparison or too big to notice. My choice (and that is my choice, not even my advice) turned out to be Maxima Chameleon 14/100 wire and Gaspatch turnbuckles on the one side and Bob's eyelet on the other side, connected with small sections of brass tubing (0.5 mm when I have the patiance, sometimes even 0.6 because they are sooo much easier then 0.5mm)

So yeah, it is mostly your decision, what technique or look you like best. There is no right or wrong anywway, as a perfect representation of reality in 1/48 is not done. A close aproximation as possible is all you can hope for.

I realise this might not help your decision or your worries, so the advise already given might just be the best... look aroud and see what you like best. Then see if you can replicate that.

Hidde
« Last Edit: February 09, 2018, 11:02:08 PM by hiddeous1973 »

Offline pepperman42

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2882
  • Sergeant, my brown pants.......
Re: Rigging For Everyone
« Reply #65 on: February 10, 2018, 12:25:52 AM »
Gee Bughunter I liked your answer. Quite Zen almost. Maybe something lost in text? It does address one of my biggest hurdles and that is, trying something and if it fails try something else. Most techniques, if they go wrong, are reversible. I think WNW instructions are for the best way to get rigging done without extra parts other than your actual rigging material. Others give a more realistic appearance. Reference material is your best friend for deciding what does and doesn't have turnbuckles etc. Study photos and drawings of the type you are modelling. If you're still here KirkH, Bob's Buckles are highly recommended and no one on this forum will ever brush you off.

Steve
I was clean,shaved and sober and I didnt care who knew it.

Offline Jeff K

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 267
Re: Rigging For Everyone
« Reply #66 on: February 10, 2018, 02:16:02 AM »
When you look at period photo's, many of the wires and their connections are hard to see, even in fairly close-up pictures. So That would mean a very small wire and a very small turnbuckle...

well just to throw more flies in the ointment...

period photos are essential, obviously. but they can't tell you everything. (even if you've got an intuitive grasp of how orthochromatic film registers color; i sure don't).

i don't trust period photos to give me an accurate idea of how turnbuckles should look. why? quite a few reasons. most of the photos that i've seen are too contrasty. most of what i see are reproductions of reproductions. many are from (or in) books printed rather coarsely (benday dots FTW!). most i've seen are pretty beat up.

here's my philosophy of deciding how things should look on a model (i guarantee it's not for everyone): i try to imagine an ideal viewing distance... the 'main view.' then i figure out what the 'close up' view should be. and then at a distance.

i try to look at a real aircraft (or ship or boat or whatever, but here we're talking aircraft) from those distances. what do the details and even the colors, look like from your 'normal' distance to your naked eye? (in both cases you have to consider the lighting conditions, which is why i prefer outdoors to indoor museums). i would then want to document with photos, but i think it's important to get that impression first. when i see 'walkarounds' they are mostly useful but they tend to be obsessively close-in on minute details. which is great for noticing how a detail is put together, but people who rely entirely on this sort of observation (in photos or 'in real') are the ones who tend to be OK with things like panel lines that look like canyons or rib tapes like ridges.

it's not necessarily easy to find somewhere with vintage aircraft (restored or replicated full size) i know... not impossible, though. there are air museums all over the world with biplanes, even here in Thailand. but if you can't do that, i'd say modern photos of restored aircraft or flying replicas give a better idea of an answer to 'would i even see turnbuckles?' than period photos. a MUCH better answer, due to the relative condition of the photos and a few AHEM slight improvements in photographic technology.

others may have their own approach for deciding this stuff, this is just one. also, everyone who approaches it this way is NOT going to end up with the same opinion of what works. or same priorities for what a model should look like.

so far, i lean toward 1/48 turnbuckles for 1/32 aircraft, but the adult version of my obsession with WWI aircraft is very new. i got some lookin' to do.

Offline Dave Brewer

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 116
Re: Rigging For Everyone
« Reply #67 on: February 10, 2018, 11:28:55 AM »
Kirk,for the 2 1/48 kits you are currently building you could try basic monofilament rigging- no eyelets,just CA one end into holes partially drilled and the other end out through full holes.You can hold the free end with locking forceps or similar to tension the line while you apply a drop of CA,and then trim the excess once it sets.Some people bring all the lines out through the lower wing and touch up after while others leave the upper wing unpainted until after rigging through it instead.In 1/48 some people are happy to use a dab of thick paint to simulate turnbuckles,that's what I usually do these days,I'd rather put my time into the more elaborate methods on 1/32 kits where I think they do need to be represented

Offline KirkH

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 34
Re: Rigging For Everyone
« Reply #68 on: February 13, 2018, 03:18:46 AM »
I took the suggestion of one of the first posters and ordered some EZ-Line so I'll see how that works on my Nieuport.  If I don't like it I'll try something different with my next plane.

Thanks for all the input.

Kirk