Author Topic: Rigging For Everyone  (Read 24396 times)

Online PrzemoL

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Re: Rigging For Everyone
« Reply #30 on: December 02, 2016, 09:03:59 AM »
I will try a diamond file, then. Thanks, Lance.
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Ash nazg thrakatuluk, agh burzum-ishi krimpatul.

Offline Manni

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Re: Rigging For Everyone
« Reply #31 on: December 02, 2016, 03:22:44 PM »
Thank You for this great tutorial. I will try next time to use some mono fishing line.
Manni
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Offline Derrick

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Re: Rigging For Everyone
« Reply #32 on: December 25, 2016, 08:47:47 AM »
For the copper eyelets what size copper wire do you use in 1/32? Also is there a particular type of copper wire or anything, example , wire from an old electric cord from a lamp.

Offline Flugzeugwerke

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Re: Rigging For Everyone
« Reply #33 on: December 25, 2016, 09:03:07 AM »


Lance, I have found out that the 3D printed material Gaspatch uses for the turnbuckles is extremely hard, almost no chance to sand, drill or even cut. The only action that can be done on it is breaking.



   Yes, very difficult to work with, but I've had some success with it using the Tamiya Diamond file they sell for Photo etch. I have had NO luck at all trying to drill out the loop on the odd blocked one, the eyelet just snaps off!
Cheers,
Lance

They can be drilled out with a carbide drill bit; I've done it many times. You must work very slowly, and work in .5mm increments until you reach the desired hole size. they can also be chucked up and turned to clean up the barrels, and, on the albatros style, the ball ends as shown below...


Offline Des

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Re: Rigging For Everyone
« Reply #34 on: December 25, 2016, 09:03:46 AM »
The copper eyelets I make for my 1:32 scale models are made from 0.13mm soft copper wire stripped from electrical cables.

Des
Late Founder of ww1aircraftmodels.com and forum.ww1aircraftmodels.com

Offline aliluke

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Re: Rigging For Everyone
« Reply #35 on: December 28, 2016, 09:02:03 AM »
Thank you Prze. This is a really great tutorial and I'm happy to discover it as I contemplate rigging my first WW1 aircraft. I was just going to use EZ Line without buckles but now thinking again.

One thing that puzzles me...Lots of the rigging shown has turnbuckles at both ends of the line. From my ship modelling background lines come from fixed blocks and go to blocks which the line can be tensioned through - that is through sheaves in the running block. So - as on a ship - wouldn't there only be a turnbuckle at one end each line not at both? Turnbuckles at both ends would not be necessary? I could be entirely wrong here...
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Offline Flugzeugwerke

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Re: Rigging For Everyone
« Reply #36 on: December 28, 2016, 09:33:15 AM »
So - as on a ship - wouldn't there only be a turnbuckle at one end each line not at both?

Correct. and on some aircraft (Sopwith Camel, Snipe etc, no "turnbuckles" at all! (but rather a tensioner at one end of the flat wires)


Offline aliluke

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Re: Rigging For Everyone
« Reply #37 on: December 28, 2016, 10:22:03 AM »
Thanks Bo
I'm guessing this what a tensioner looks like - on a Pup (?) at the aviation museum in Christchurch NZ. It is barely thicker than the line and at 1:32 would be virtually invisible - just a slight thickening.

Great photo of the Snipe by the way - all the lines at full scale look completely clean of rigging devices. Though good to note the lines are jointed where they cross. Expect this can be done with a wee dab of glue on a 1:32 representation.



All the same I'm going to have a play with buckles on one model or another and Prze's tut is a really good guide for that.

Cheers
Alistair
It ain't a hobby if you have to hurry.

Online PrzemoL

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Re: Rigging For Everyone
« Reply #38 on: December 28, 2016, 06:47:40 PM »
Thank you Prze. This is a really great tutorial and I'm happy to discover it as I contemplate rigging my first WW1 aircraft. I was just going to use EZ Line without buckles but now thinking again.

One thing that puzzles me...Lots of the rigging shown has turnbuckles at both ends of the line. From my ship modelling background lines come from fixed blocks and go to blocks which the line can be tensioned through - that is through sheaves in the running block. So - as on a ship - wouldn't there only be a turnbuckle at one end each line not at both? Turnbuckles at both ends would not be necessary? I could be entirely wrong here...

Bo gave a part of the answer aleready. 3 cents from my side - on German planes turnbuckles are present. And to my surprise, sometimes there are turnbuckles on both ends of lines! Like on DFW C.V - clearly visible in the photos. I have it done on my model. But it is not always so, one has to check the photos.
Ash nazg durbatuluk, ash nazg gimbatul,
Ash nazg thrakatuluk, agh burzum-ishi krimpatul.

Offline aliluke

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Re: Rigging For Everyone
« Reply #39 on: December 28, 2016, 07:51:27 PM »
Thanks Prze
An interesting discussion and I'm sure one that has been had before by very much more experienced WW1 builders than me (I have no experience at all so that is easy to surpass!). Thanks to Bo's post, I feel relieved of turnbuckle duty on the Snipe but will certainly try it with your guides on my next kit- which will be a German plane.

Cheers
Alistair
It ain't a hobby if you have to hurry.

Offline Flugzeugwerke

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Re: Rigging For Everyone
« Reply #40 on: December 29, 2016, 12:03:48 AM »
The short answer is "check your references." If you are building a WNW kit, you are generally in luck; they choose subjects that are well documented. Their site is a treasure trove of historical photos that generally strive to illustrate all the details.

And don't overlook the reference library here!!! Jamo in particular has taken many hundreds of excellent photos of the TVAL birds with a modellers' eye. I've added a few from the museums I've visited, as have others.

Of course the museum examples too often have errors but collectively they give tremendous insight into these things...

Offline acewwi

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Re: Rigging For Everyone
« Reply #41 on: December 29, 2016, 09:09:05 PM »
Bo gave a part of the answer aleready. 3 cents from my side - on German planes turnbuckles are present. And to my surprise, sometimes there are turnbuckles on both ends of lines! Like on DFW C.V - clearly visible in the photos. I have it done on my model. But it is not always so, one has to check the photos.

Dear PrzemoL

Your DFW is awesome but the theory on there turnbukles on both ends of ends of lines on DFW C.V i think is not correct.

I think that the confused existence of turnbuckls at the top of inner struts.

I suppose that the streching of the lines could not be at the point where the fuselage joins the wings and turnbuckle mounted on the top of inner strut.

I quote the following photos from the official WNW's site by labeling my thinking.


My thoughts do not break your amazing work

Cheers
Spyros

PS: Some photos of my own effort
« Last Edit: December 29, 2016, 09:14:13 PM by acewwi »

Online PrzemoL

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Re: Rigging For Everyone
« Reply #42 on: December 30, 2016, 02:34:56 AM »
Thank you, acewwi, for your input. It does make a lot of sense. It seems, I have erronously extrapolated the existence of turnbuckles on some cables at their top mounting points onto all of them. I will have to live with my model as it is now, too late for changes...
Ash nazg durbatuluk, ash nazg gimbatul,
Ash nazg thrakatuluk, agh burzum-ishi krimpatul.

Offline aliluke

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Re: Rigging For Everyone
« Reply #43 on: December 30, 2016, 07:41:54 AM »
A very interesting discussion.

It seems that as a general rule - turnbuckles on lower wing where the line goes to the upper wing and turnbuckles on the upper wing where the line goes to the fuselage. But, as Bo emphasizes, research is where the answer ultimately is found.

Spyros - your buckles are very impressive - how did you do them?

Now I just have to get a DFW CV which I hadn't looked at before - it is a very elegant aircraft.
It ain't a hobby if you have to hurry.

Offline acewwi

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Re: Rigging For Everyone
« Reply #44 on: January 01, 2017, 02:16:48 AM »
Dear Alistair

Because my English is too poor i use transtator to my posts.
So at the first opportunity i will try to describe the technique that i use.

Temporarily i post a few fhotos of my DFW rigging.

1. Undercarrage wires


2. Control cables


3. Bracing


Happy New Year
Spyros