Author Topic: Von Bertrab's Albatros D.III  (Read 423 times)

Offline Rip Van Winkle

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Von Bertrab's Albatros D.III
« on: September 28, 2018, 08:14:15 AM »
I am building Roden 1/72 scale Albatros D.III in Von Bertab  markings.  I am confused about the wing camouflage and wing radiator  placement.  I followed the Roden instructions and discovered that they are inaccurate.   What production batch or serial number was this aircraft?  I have seen models with central and offset wing radiator.  My understanding is the serial number determined the appropriate wing camouflage. Also was the horizontal stabilizer black (purple) or factory finish?  I am about half finished with this project and am frustrated that it may be totally inaccurate. I would appreciate any guidance.

Offline AndRoby67

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Re: Von Bertrab's Albatros D.III
« Reply #1 on: May 11, 2019, 05:43:25 AM »
Hi Rip,
after all this time maybe you have your question replied in other forums, but I try to help you.
The famous photo of Von Bertrab in front of his D.III shows an Albatros with central radiator on main wing. From the "Albatros D.III Special" edited by Albatros Production the author stated that it has standard three colors camo on wings with pale blue underneath.
The real puzzle is the color of the fuselage. Because, also if everyone of us saw only profiles with black body, many historians have put some doubts because of the dark border of the white cross on fuselage. If the border was black, the fuselage had a more light color. Someone said purple, some other said orange, the official color of Jasta 30.
There are other three photos of that D.III, but they are not useful...
Good luck!
Roberto

Offline Black Max 72

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Re: Von Bertrab's Albatros D.III
« Reply #2 on: May 11, 2019, 11:21:27 AM »
Didn't Mannock describe the colour as purple in his combat report? If so it must've been a very dark shade or why feel the need to invert the colour of the crosses. Just a thought, the latter staffelfuhrer of Jasta 30 Hans Georg von der Marwitz had his Pfalz D.IIIa painted in what has been described as a wine red or dark burgundy. One man's burgundy is another man's purple so to speak, Marwitz's Pfalz appears very dark in photos as well. It could be a coincidence or maybe Jasta 30 had a history with the colour.

Dave Rickard
Rockhampton QLD

Offline Petie2nd

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Re: Von Bertrab's Albatros D.III
« Reply #3 on: May 11, 2019, 12:47:05 PM »
The following information comes from the definitive Jasta 30 history by Bruno Schmäling & Winfried Bock. During the Spring/Summer of 1917, orange had not yet been established as the squadron color. The orange diamonds came in around November 17, on Albatros D.V's & later, Pfalz D.IIIa's. When the Fokker D.VII came along, the diamonds were no longer used, but most pilots used orange, in tribute to Hans Bethge, on major parts of the aircraft - fuselage, top wing, tail, etc. in addition to their personal colors.

Before late 1917, individual pilots were allowed to use personal color schemes, and there was no uniform Jasta marking. For Von der Marwitz, "Wine red" was his favorite color, and he also used light blue on struts and cowlings. The blue was the color of his original unit, shown in his cap band and uniform trim. Von Bertrab's band and uniform trim was black, and the authors state that he had a black fuselage. The cross outline is visible against the fuselage, which could possibly be due to the outline being a glossier black. In April/May, he just had the all-black fuselage (with white fuselage cross); by late May/June, he had added the "star", shown in the book profile as red with white outline.

Bruno Schmäling had interviewed the surviving members of Jasta 30 at length, and much of the color information is based on those interviews.

Pete

Offline Black Max 72

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Re: Von Bertrab's Albatros D.III
« Reply #4 on: May 11, 2019, 03:04:08 PM »
The following information comes from the definitive Jasta 30 history by Bruno Schmäling & Winfried Bock. During the Spring/Summer of 1917, orange had not yet been established as the squadron color. The orange diamonds came in around November 17, on Albatros D.V's & later, Pfalz D.IIIa's. When the Fokker D.VII came along, the diamonds were no longer used, but most pilots used orange, in tribute to Hans Bethge, on major parts of the aircraft - fuselage, top wing, tail, etc. in addition to their personal colors.

Before late 1917, individual pilots were allowed to use personal color schemes, and there was no uniform Jasta marking. For Von der Marwitz, "Wine red" was his favorite color, and he also used light blue on struts and cowlings. The blue was the color of his original unit, shown in his cap band and uniform trim. Von Bertrab's band and uniform trim was black, and the authors state that he had a black fuselage. The cross outline is visible against the fuselage, which could possibly be due to the outline being a glossier black. In April/May, he just had the all-black fuselage (with white fuselage cross); by late May/June, he had added the "star", shown in the book profile as red with white outline.

Bruno Schmäling had interviewed the surviving members of Jasta 30 at length, and much of the color information is based on those interviews.

Pete

That makes sense, personally I prefer von Bertrab's Albatros painted black, it is definitely one of the most striking D.IIIs. I was hoping someone with that book would chime in, it looks like a fascinating read, one for my 'to purchase list.

Dave Rickard
Rockhampton QLD

Offline Rip Van Winkle

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Re: Von Bertrab's Albatros D.III
« Reply #5 on: May 14, 2019, 09:44:34 AM »
Thanks for all the replies.  I went with the central wing radiator and a black fuselage.  It appears that black was a popular color for german aircraft.