Author Topic: Priming  (Read 661 times)

Offline JimF

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 43
Priming
« on: June 27, 2018, 06:40:30 AM »
I'm starting the 1st aircraft model I have done in over 45 years :)

I have always primed any armor models, usually when either the basic build is complete, or close to it.

Not sure about WW1 aircraft, as the painting of seems a bit more involved. I assume (dangerous, I know) that folks do prime, at which point do most do so?

Thanks.

Jim F

Offline Dave W

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 640
Re: Priming
« Reply #1 on: June 27, 2018, 01:47:31 PM »
Whether you use a primer can depend on various factors - are you a brush or airbrush painter? Acrylics or enamels?

As a brush painter I always prime surfaces to give the main paint finish a "key" to adhere to. This is especially so with acrylics and crucial if you use brands like Vallejo.

I used to brew a thin mix of Humbrol light grey enamel as a standard primer but have now discovered Vallejo's acrylic primer which can be brushed on to bare plastic before the main coats are applied.

Dave Wilson
Gold Coast
Australia
Owner and Administrator of ww1aircraftmodels.com and forum.ww1aircraftmodels.com

Offline Gisbod

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1567
Re: Priming
« Reply #2 on: June 27, 2018, 04:13:51 PM »
I always prime, although Iíve never tried not priming!

A black base gives the opportunity for a bit of shadowing in the recesses. It also seems to give depth to the overall finish. I think it must help if youíre masking with tape too.

Iíve recently used MRPís Fine black primer (spray only) and it gives a very thin, durable, silk like finish.

Guy

Ps I donít work for MRP  ;D

Offline Dave Brewer

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 149
Re: Priming
« Reply #3 on: June 27, 2018, 04:58:19 PM »
Good question Jim.I always prime as a matter of habit,helps to check for flaws and give a uniform surface to work from.I definitely wouldn't be happy spraying acrylics on an unprimed kit although that's a personal prejudice not grounded in science,in fact I've being experimenting with Badger Stynlrez acrylic primer recently and am pretty impressed with it.

Offline JimF

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 43
Re: Priming
« Reply #4 on: June 27, 2018, 09:18:44 PM »
To clarify a bit, I'm going to be doing mostly airbrushing.

So, though only 4 reolies at this point, seems some do, a few don't.

I didn't, in my early days, but found it was not needed, with Humbrol enamals, which I mostly used. I did start, at some point, most likely after reading about doing so in a modeling magazine.

During my longer period in model railroading, I tended to enjoy building structure kits more that any thing else. With those, especially the wood kits, it was almost a necessity, so it became habit. But you did almost all priming before you started assembly.

So that's the other half of my question, when does one prime? While parts are still on the sprue, as sub-assemblies, or when the model is almost completed? Priming isn't mentioned in a lot of build logs as such, and when it is, the point st which it is done never seems to get mentioned.

Thanks again, folks.

Jim F

Online RAGIII

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 11102
Re: Priming
« Reply #5 on: June 27, 2018, 11:13:49 PM »
Like some others I do not prime ( Most of the time). I think the decision in my case is based on what paints I am using, how much masking I will need to do etc. If I am using Aviattic Lozenge the white serves as a dual purpose primer and base coat. On Most WW1 aircraft priming in subassemblies such as fuselage with lower wings attached would seem logical and when I do prime that is what I do. If you have looked at my Albatros builds in Under Construction you will see that I painted and masked bands and wood finish with no primer. Make your own choice as I would tend to think it can't hurt just may not be a Necessity  8)
RAGIII
"A man has to know his limitations": Harry Callahan

"Don't slop it on" Lynda Geisler

Online Borsos

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1982
Re: Priming
« Reply #6 on: June 28, 2018, 12:16:27 AM »
I am used to priming my models as the primer makes flaws and problematic aeras visible and gives a good grip to the Acrylics I spray. When I am using Mr. Paint inks/colors, which I still do rarely but I plan to do it more and more often, I donít prime the surfaces.
I always build my models in sub-assemblies that are in most of the time taped together to see the end result. If this taping session doesnít show any fitting or other  problems, I prime and paint my models.
Borsos
"Deux armťes aux prises, c'est une grande armťe qui se suicide."
Barbusse.
"Ein Berg in Deutschland kann doch einen Berg in Frankreich nicht beleidigen. Oder ein FluŖ oder ein Wald oder ein Weizenfeld."
Remarque.

Offline rayb24

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 204
Re: Priming
« Reply #7 on: July 22, 2018, 05:14:44 AM »
When I was using enamels or the old floquil laquer based paints I never primed. But now I use acrylics Iíve found itís almost a requirement. Most acrylics are fragile and over smooth plastic, itís too risky to not have a primed surface to give the final  coat something to adhere too.
I often use rattle can automotive primers, just be careful of keeping the coats thin.


As others have said you also get the added benefit of seeing flaws that were not noticeable.
Ray