Author Topic: Rigging For Everyone  (Read 45992 times)

Offline Early Bird Fan

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Re: Rigging For Everyone
« Reply #90 on: June 06, 2020, 05:26:52 PM »
this is a very enlightening thread, especially for a beginner in rigging like me. It's interesting to read everyone's thoughts on different products and what works for them etc. So far i've rigged 2 planes, my first one was an eindecker e.iii as it's a good plane to learn on when it comes to rigging and the second was a be2c. For both jobs i used 0.18 stainless steel wire spun in a drill to straighten and stiffen it, as i build in 1/72 this is slightly over scale but negates the need to drill any holes so for a nervy beginner it seemed a good option, i also have a free endless supply so avoided possibly buying the wrong stuff. I have some fishing line somewhere so might see what diameters i've got and think about using that on my next build

Offline hrcoleman66

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Re: Rigging For Everyone
« Reply #91 on: January 28, 2021, 12:36:21 PM »
When I was doing a lot of modelling, I used many methods.

I first started rigging by drilling holes all the way through the flying surfaces and threading monofilament all the way up from a hole drilled in the lower main plane, through the hole drilled in the upper main plane and then down through an adjacent hole.


This gave lots of structural integrity and provided you got the tension correct as you applied the CA to the holes to secure the monofilament, then the flying surfaces maintained correct dihedral and angle of incidence as well.
But, you had a clean up job afterwards to cover or finish the holes drilled in the top of the upper main plane and the bottom of the lower main plane.  So there was sanding and painting required AFTER rigging...  which was a real PITA.

I did many like this.  The Roden Felixstowe F2a was a prime example, and in 1/72 scale, there really wasn't a more practical way that I knew of at the time.  That model was built about 17 years ago and is still one of the only ones from back than that I still have in one piece.

Another method I tried on the Eduard Sopwith Camel was using nickle plated copper wire, I think it was about 0.5mm.  I strightenned it by rolling it under a steel rule on a plate of glass and then fitted it between pre drilled holes in the flying surfaces.  This time the holes were only part way drilled through the wing.
Unfortunately, I made the mistake of applying CA to both ends of each piece of wire, which meant that on hot days, I had saggy rigging.
I never tried that again.

The Roden BE2C, Brisfit and Eduard Albatros W4 were both rigged using the tedious manufacture of hundreds of tiny eyelets made from very fine copper wire CA'd into pre-drilled holes and then using the Monofilament and tiny tube method.  The tubes were made from heat stretched cotton ear buds, cut to length with cuticle scissors. 

I have never tried Ezyline.  I have some, but...  trying to get the ends to stick with CA scares me a little.

I have invested in some Albion Alloy brass tubing which will be here soon, and I think that the Eduard SE5a that I'm working on to get me back into swing of things will be rigged using this and monofilament...  secured to the eyelets twisted from fine copper wire.

Cheers,

Hugh


Bughunter

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Re: Rigging For Everyone
« Reply #92 on: January 29, 2021, 01:41:41 AM »
Please be aware, that the SE.5a was equipped with RAF wires, so no turnbuckles and eyelets. The "RAF wire" are flat, aerodynamically shaped steel ropes with threads on both ends, mounted in terminals. WNW tell to use 0.1x0.3mm in 1/32.

There are a lot of resources about it in this great forum.

Cheers,
Frank

Offline Dave Brewer

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Re: Rigging For Everyone
« Reply #93 on: January 29, 2021, 07:08:25 AM »
Worth mentioning again that monofilament nylon fishing line (not braid line) can be easily deformed to a flat profile by drawing it through a pair of round-nosed pliers. I run a black sharpie followed by a silver one along the now flattened line and it's ready for use replicating RAF wire. A section of polymide or brass tube at each end, similarly coloured, represents the terminals.
Cheers,
Dave.

Offline hrcoleman66

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Re: Rigging For Everyone
« Reply #94 on: January 29, 2021, 08:16:25 AM »
Please be aware, that the SE.5a was equipped with RAF wires, so no turnbuckles and eyelets. The "RAF wire" are flat, aerodynamically shaped steel ropes with threads on both ends, mounted in terminals. WNW tell to use 0.1x0.3mm in 1/32.

There are a lot of resources about it in this great forum.

Cheers,
Frank

I know, but at 1/48 scale...  My rigging on the SE5a is going to be a representation.  And admittedly, not entirely accurate.
I don't have small enough Taps or Dies in my BA tap and die set to accommodate accuracy.

Cheers,

Hugh

Offline Stuart Malone

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Re: Rigging For Everyone
« Reply #95 on: September 30, 2021, 06:07:34 AM »
I originally posted my rigging reference in Hints and Tips some time ago.  It might be more appropriate here.  I have recently updated it with the line from AK Interactive.  Please see the attached pdf.

Stuart

Offline cduckworth

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EZ line issues
« Reply #96 on: April 23, 2022, 05:03:05 AM »
Iíve been using EZ Line for many years and recently discovered that itís breaking down on several of my 1/48 builds. Anyone else seen this?  Iím going back to fishing line.
"Look alive. Here comes a buzzard."  Pogo

Offline WD

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Re: Rigging For Everyone
« Reply #97 on: April 23, 2022, 10:23:56 AM »
Sorry to hear that Charlie. I suppose all elastic (and this stuff does have elastic in it, no?) breaks down over time.

WD

Online macsporran

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Re: Rigging For Everyone
« Reply #98 on: April 23, 2022, 06:01:49 PM »
Bummer, Charlie, sorry to hear that too.
I've never really liked the stuff as it has no structural strength - which I used to need to support heavy resin wings.
Good warning though.
Sandy

Bughunter

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Re: Rigging For Everyone
« Reply #99 on: April 25, 2022, 03:52:04 AM »
My first model with the flexible rigging is from 2016 - no problems so far.
But it is a known fact, that UV light can harm this rigging. But I think my glass cabinet protects the models (as glass filters UV) and the cabinet is far away from direct sunshine. Exhibitions are more dangerous regarding light, but this are "short moments" compared to the cabinet.
Another thing: I do not "over stretch" the lines - only a bit shorter as the length without force. So they are tight, but not under strong force.

Bye the way, the safe storage is also needed to protect the Aviattic lozenge decals against the UV light.

Cheers,
Frank

Offline Berman

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Re: Rigging For Everyone
« Reply #100 on: April 26, 2022, 12:26:19 AM »
 There are other factors which will deteriorate elastic materials such as atmospheric ozone, temperature extremes, mold, and UV light from fluorescent tubes. Lighting your cabinet display with LEDs is a safer option for elastic rigging and Aviattic decals.