Author Topic: On this Day (WWI aviation news), Vol. 3  (Read 4674 times)

Offline PJ Fisher

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1070
Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news), Vol. 3
« Reply #75 on: June 10, 2024, 10:51:15 PM »
First to Fly
Captain Herbert Ambrose Cooper was the first New Zealander to join the Royal Flying Corps and learned to fly before the Great War.  Cooper was awarded Aviator's Certificate #729 by the Royal Aero Club in January 1914.  Here he's shown sitting in the pulpit of a Vickers F.B.5 'Gunbus' - the first aircraft purpose-built for air-to-air combat.  "The F.B.5 began to be seen on the Western Front when the first reached No.2 Squadron RFC on 5 February 1915.[11] The type served in ones and twos with several other units before No. 11 Squadron RFC became the world's first fighter squadron when, fully equipped with the F.B.5, it deployed to Villers-Bretonneux, France on 25 July 1915" (via wikipedia).  Cooper was flying with No. 11 Squadron when he was killed accidentally one year after today's report was published.
(from the Auckland Weekly News, 10 June 1915):



(image via iwm.uk.org)
« Last Edit: June 12, 2024, 01:30:30 PM by PJ Fisher »

Offline PJ Fisher

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1070
Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news), Vol. 3
« Reply #76 on: June 12, 2024, 02:07:28 PM »
Rising Sons
Ninety-five-hundred kilometers east of the Western Front the latest and largest cadet class has graduated from the Nippon Flying School.  Following is a photo dated to 1917 that may likely depict these fledgling flyers assembled in front of one of the school's Tamai trainer biplanes.  Alas, this report comes just a week before the crash of NFS trainer #3, which resulted in the death of the school's flying instructor and a civilian passenger (as reported here last June: https://forum.ww1aircraftmodels.com/index.php?topic=13750.msg256004#msg256004)
(from the Montgomery Advertiser, 11 June 1917):



(image via wikimedia.org)

Offline PJ Fisher

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1070
Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news), Vol. 3
« Reply #77 on: June 13, 2024, 08:06:34 AM »
Salute to Saufley
Ensign R. C. Saufley was designated Aviator #14 by the United States Navy in 1915. He was graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1908. Today's news marks the anniversary of his death in a flying accident at NAS Pensacola, Florida, while attempting a seaplane endurance record.  His Curtiss Model E 'Triad' (serial AH-8) was airborne nearly nine hours when it crashed for unknown reasons on crash on Santa Rosa Island. The Model E lays claim to being the first successful flying bpat and the first airplane acquired by the U.S. Navy. The Fletcher-class destroyer USS SAUFLEY (DD-465), one of the most-decorated US ships of WWII, was named in this airman's  honor.
(from the Bourbon News, 12 June 1917):



Check out this video of a Model E replica in flight:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NcaAyOtgWoA
« Last Edit: June 13, 2024, 08:21:20 AM by PJ Fisher »