Author Topic: Felixstowe Porte Baby  (Read 171 times)

Offline Bluesfan

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Felixstowe Porte Baby
« on: March 23, 2020, 07:05:03 AM »
This discovery today really cheered me up! I had no idea any film of the Porte Baby existed, but here it is freely available to watch on the BFI website.

https://player.bfi.org.uk/free/film/watch-porte-flying-boat-1917-online

I know it's a very niche subject, but this type, of which 11 were built, was the largest aeroplane used operationally by Great Britain in WWI. It wasn't especially successful and watching this film one can see straightaway why the smaller F.2A was much more useful, being more manoeuverable and better armed. Though I think the Baby had more endurance.

Note that it's tagged as being from 1917 but I would think, from the 'London New York' markings crudely painted on the sides that this is the Baby that was being prepared for a possible transatlantic flight in 1919(?). Beaten to the punch of course by Alcock and Brown.

Cheers
Mark

Offline Juan

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Re: Felixstowe Porte Baby
« Reply #1 on: March 23, 2020, 07:22:11 AM »
Tried looking, got an error message that only view-able in the UK.   :o

Offline Dave Brewer

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Re: Felixstowe Porte Baby
« Reply #2 on: March 23, 2020, 08:40:58 AM »
Me too.

Offline Bluesfan

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Re: Felixstowe Porte Baby
« Reply #3 on: March 23, 2020, 12:17:56 PM »
That's a shame, sorry gents.

From what I can remember: we see the aircraft drawn out of the hangar at Felixstowe, sideways on rails - kind of interesting, it's so big they have to wait to attach the rudder and elevators outside; a loading sequence; then it's in the water and takes off; interesting for me to see after often reading that the larger machines were better at handling heavier seas. Then, a fair length of in flight film, from both within the craft looking out, and from an accompanying plane. Finally, a landing. All kind of nice, because on film the type turns out to have been a more elegant plane than I'd imagined only from plan views and static shots.

Various other details others might pick up on. I'm just surprised and glad that film of such an obscure and forgotten type actually exists!

Mark

Offline Dave Brewer

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Re: Felixstowe Porte Baby
« Reply #4 on: March 23, 2020, 02:41:50 PM »
Got it,set my VPN to the UK.Certainly is remarkable footage!
Cheers,
Dave.

Offline RLWP

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Re: Felixstowe Porte Baby
« Reply #5 on: March 23, 2020, 07:50:09 PM »
Wow - looks like they nearly collected the chase boat on take off

That's a great film

Richard
Hendon for flying - the fastest way to the ground!