Author Topic: cleaning photo etch  (Read 816 times)

Offline s.e.charles

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cleaning photo etch
« on: September 26, 2023, 07:09:15 PM »
watching a YT video, there was mention of using "photo etch burnishing fluid" rather than metal primer (i assume something like Mr Hobby   Amazon.com: Mr. Hobby Mr. Metal Primer 40ml. Bottle Gundam : Arts, Crafts & Sewing).   

https://youtu.be/bbp_97jBeFc?si=l-pah9r0TfyyFAVG


Q: do i want "metal tracks burnishing fluid"   Amazon.com: Metallic Tracks Burnishing Fluid : Arts, Crafts & Sewing

or would i be better off with   "photo etch burnishing fluid"   Amazon.com: Photo-Etch Burnishing Fluid : Arts, Crafts & Sewing

or are they the same thing?

thanks


Offline Tim Mixon

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Re: cleaning photo etch
« Reply #1 on: September 26, 2023, 11:58:38 PM »
Sorry I can’t help you with your original question. I have recently started using Mr. Metal Primer, what was the reason you decided to change to burnishing fluid?

Thanks,
Tim

Offline s.e.charles

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Re: cleaning photo etch
« Reply #2 on: September 27, 2023, 12:43:45 AM »
the YT producer indicated that it would etch the brass. that implies texture to me. and it was a the reason which provoked my question.

also, one product is more moderately priced than the other two, but i don't know the nuanced differences.

Offline NigelR

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Re: cleaning photo etch
« Reply #3 on: September 27, 2023, 06:29:12 PM »
I've never used burnishing fluid as a primer. I've tried it on machine gun barrels and all I got was a patchy black finish which flaked off when I bent the etch. But that was probably just me.

I use this stuff: https://www.scalemodelshop.co.uk/metal-prep-4k-vms-p17725/?gclid=Cj0KCQjwpc-oBhCGARIsAH6ote8-UNSliKS85B7IaP9WlUmw2SMwhudUZjxmZq_FfYMJOfsG4ovdnmAaAvlXEALw_wcB

It's not cheap, but works for me. You need to clean the etch first with IPA or similar.

Offline s.e.charles

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Re: cleaning photo etch
« Reply #4 on: September 27, 2023, 06:42:03 PM »
not a product which i've heard, but the VMS range appears in a number of guises and is something which i'd like to dip a toe. the cost is pretty much in line with the products i mentioned and from your caution if the bending/ forming is done prior, it might be a good candidate.

thanks

Offline Tim Mixon

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Re: cleaning photo etch
« Reply #5 on: September 28, 2023, 03:14:41 AM »
In my short experience with the Mr.Metal primer, the “etching” is microscopic and not noticeable at all.  I have only applied it after bending the pieces ( rolling Spandau jackets) etc .  The paint does seem to adhere a lot better but I have not extensively tested it for durability.  The YT post I watched said it would react with the plastic though so use caution!

Tim

Offline s.e.charles

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Re: cleaning photo etch
« Reply #6 on: September 28, 2023, 08:32:27 PM »
i'm almost embarrassed to have left the flock, but i've "cheaped-out" and ordered a bottle of https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0000C514O/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&th=1&psc=1.

i know it's not what the original question asked, but i have a workshop full of chemicals & abrasives and i wonder if i'm guilty of creating a problem where it doesn't exist.

i have used Blacken It before to color brass, and think this (linked above) will satiate the empty spot on the shelf until a real problem rears its head!

thanks for the inputs, All.

Offline davec

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Re: cleaning photo etch
« Reply #7 on: September 28, 2023, 10:57:56 PM »
I've used the Birchwood Casey brass black on my model ships.  I like it a lot better for blackening brass than blacken it.  I wouldn't use either for priming.  They are both very finicky for blackening.   The Birchwood Casey seems to be less so, and does a little better when the parts have been silver soldered. The parts need to be really clean (I usually soak in a mild acid, then acetone, or put in an ultrasonic cleaner) first.  Diluting the agent helps prevent the thick crusting that Nigel wrote about.   I've also started using copper when I need blackened metal.  the blackening agents (different from what you are using) for copper don't stain wood, so sometimes you can install the part, then blacken it. A lot of times, paint is a lot easier.