Author Topic: It’s a B....B...Bf... Boooring, I know, I know I know... (Eduard 1:32)  (Read 303 times)

Online Borsos

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Yes, I did it. And yes, I am ashamed — at least a little bit. To a certain extent it was like watching porn. I never, never ever wanted to become one of those Messerschmidt-Tiger-Tank modeller who ... Ah well, I think you all know what I mean.
I did it nevertheless, there was this mad voice in the back of my head.  :o
Eduard 1:32 Profipack version with brassin wheels, Master armament and Eduard PE set (mainly for the wheel bays). I used the kit‘s decals, I wanted something typical mid 1940 to fit my „Mrs Ainsworth“ vignette. And yes, there are a Spitfire and a Hurricane in my stash....







Well, and now back to some real modelling. Something with wood, wires and canvas...
Andreas
"Deux armées aux prises, c'est une grande armée qui se suicide."
Barbusse.
"Ein Berg in Deutschland kann doch einen Berg in Frankreich nicht beleidigen. Oder ein Fluß oder ein Wald oder ein Weizenfeld."
Remarque.

Offline lcarroll

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   No shame in this Andreas, it's a real beauty! A change such as this is good for the mojo, and ultimately adds to the pleasure of a return to that, to use your term, "real modelling"!
Lovely work!
Cheers,
Lance

Offline Terri

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She is a beauty Andreas , nothing shameful here at all . How was the over all fit of the kit ? And what did you add ?

I have Dragons ( Cyperhobby) 32 scale kit , and it is very complex kit , but it has beautiful detail .



Terri

Offline RAGIII

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I Love your 109! You even chose to Model the right Squadron  8) As always the figures really set off your beautiful Model!
RAGIII
"A man has to know his limitations": Harry Callahan

"Don't slop it on" Lynda Geisler

Online Borsos

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Thank you very much, Lance, Terri and Rick!

Terri, it’d say the kit is very nice but it has two aeras where it needs some extra work. At first the fit between wings and fuselage is not really good. There’s a gap of 2-3mm to cover up. I used stretched sprue for the first time ever, diluted with Tamiya extra thin cement. It worked well and left a smooth surface after sanding that could be engraved quite well. The second problematic aera is that this kit is intended to be built with open engine and if you want to use the enginge hood, you have to cut some details off the firewall that are in the way. And you have to leave the engine completely off. So I had to glue some black cardboard behind the engine openings like cooling slots to cover up the emptiness. If you don’t do this, you can look through a completely empty engine compartment. Besides of this, it was a joy to build.

Andreas
"Deux armées aux prises, c'est une grande armée qui se suicide."
Barbusse.
"Ein Berg in Deutschland kann doch einen Berg in Frankreich nicht beleidigen. Oder ein Fluß oder ein Wald oder ein Weizenfeld."
Remarque.

Offline lone modeller

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I have to write Andreas that whatever you build, it is done to perfection. It is also always interesting with your figures - always a story, never a model. Never mind it is later than wood and wire - it still has a fan on the front and lacks a hole at the back!

You have written that you are going to get back to real modelling - obviously another pusher to go with your wonderful FE 2d conversion....!

Stephen.

Online Borsos

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Thanks so much for your kind words, Stephen. Another pusher has to wait a little longer, but I am back in 1916/17 again  :)
Andreas
"Deux armées aux prises, c'est une grande armée qui se suicide."
Barbusse.
"Ein Berg in Deutschland kann doch einen Berg in Frankreich nicht beleidigen. Oder ein Fluß oder ein Wald oder ein Weizenfeld."
Remarque.

Offline Gene K

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I did it nevertheless, ... .

And I'm glad you did! Spectacular, especially the figures.

Gene K

Offline Monty

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Lovely 109 Andreas! And always a great choice for a subject! Beautifully done and the figures really set it off and tell a story... Magnificent! Marc

Offline Bughunter

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Andreas, the figures are fantastic! The life vest, jacket and faces are sooo realistic! Your figures are getting better and better.

And beside the fact, that I'm a bit tired of 109 and 190, there in another fact:
I have the chance to visit every Wednesday some 109, a 108 and the 262 (and can see them in flight from time to time), and none of the four or five 109 has such heavy shaded panel lines! In my eyes this is to much. Yes I know, that is some modeling "style", but has nothing to do with reality.
Here the red 7 (a G-4) for example:


Sorry Andreas, it is just my opinion.

Cheers,
Frank
Wikipedia says: A model is a simplified representation of reality.
So I create downscaled originals.

Online Borsos

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Thanks a lot Gene, Monty and Frank!

Frank, yes it is true that postshading can be a modelling „style“, like you said. It is better explained with the phenomenon that many (including me) try to break up monotone surfaces on models, because they easily look toy like. Darkening and lightening up is one of the methodes often used here.

But that’s not the point here. Thanks for posting the photo of a today’s Bf-109, but this has nothing to do with what they looked like in WW2.
We are talking about warbirds. They were dirty most of their wartime career. Not a little, just messy. There was no time to keep them clean. The evidence is there, have a look at these low quality but contemporary photos. Even there panel lines are visible on these pictures and heavy staining all around:






Never ever try to disprove weathering on old airplanes with the help of today’s photos of museum machines. These are the babies of their owners. They are perfectly maintained, kept clean and polished. And they are flown using modern oils and lubricants, not wartime replacements. It’s like owning a vintage car. It is kept dry and clean all the time, it gets all the love and care of the owner. When it is driven on sunny Sundays these vintage cars look as neat as a pin. That has simply nothing to do with the reality in which these cars were kept in their days. And here we are talking about warmachines that were handled in the most extreme circumstances imaginable!

It’s interesting as I know many people who criticize modellers for their “overdone“ weathering. For instance I was talking almost an hour with an elder modeller who tried to explain me that carrier aircraft of WW2 would have had never ever any signs of dirt, discoloration or paint chipping. The yellow primer would never ever have been visible in reality after the plane had left the factory. These would be legends, invented by modellers who want to go wild with weathering; in reality the crews always kept their airplanes as clean as a baby bottom. Then I showed him the famous color pictures of heavily messed up SBD Dauntlesses after Midway from LIFE magazine which were unknown to him til that day. And everything was there on these pictures. He wasn’t so convinced of his point any more then.
Let’s use contemporary sources when it comes to assess circumstances in the past, not anachronistic material.

Best regards
Andreas
"Deux armées aux prises, c'est une grande armée qui se suicide."
Barbusse.
"Ein Berg in Deutschland kann doch einen Berg in Frankreich nicht beleidigen. Oder ein Fluß oder ein Wald oder ein Weizenfeld."
Remarque.

Offline gbrivio

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Very nice Emil, with  beautiful surroundings.
Ciao
Giuseppe

Offline aaronc

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Man that's some great work.