Author Topic: C.O.W Biplane 1912  (Read 3666 times)

Offline kensar

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1726
  • Reshaping the world - one piece at a time.
Re: C.O.W Biplane 1912
« Reply #15 on: March 06, 2020, 03:49:05 AM »
This certainly has odd features around the rigging.
Tail rigging is like the Tommy's.  I'll be tackling that before too long.



Online RLWP

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1396
  • Bodger
Re: C.O.W Biplane 1912
« Reply #16 on: March 06, 2020, 04:45:51 AM »
I found this drawing on the internet somewhere, annoyingly I can't find the website now:



You can see the bracing wires on the struts, then little triangles with horizontal wires. I can't find anything to confirm those triangles or wires - yet

Richard
Hendon for flying - the fastest way to the ground!

Offline lone modeller

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4264
Re: C.O.W Biplane 1912
« Reply #17 on: March 06, 2020, 07:03:42 AM »
The use of triangle bracing on struts seems to have been rather more common than some people think. The Caproni Ca 5 that I built last year had them and I have seen other aircraft with them too - usually early types such as this or large ones such as the Ca 5. I suspect that your drawing is correct but looking for such tiny features on grainy photos is a bit of a challenge.

Stephen.

Offline gbrivio

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1454
Re: C.O.W Biplane 1912
« Reply #18 on: March 06, 2020, 07:32:39 AM »
Interesting and unusual subject, I will follow your progress.
Ciao
Giuseppe

Online RLWP

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1396
  • Bodger
Re: C.O.W Biplane 1912
« Reply #19 on: March 06, 2020, 09:36:57 AM »
The use of triangle bracing on struts seems to have been rather more common than some people think. The Caproni Ca 5 that I built last year had them and I have seen other aircraft with them too - usually early types such as this or large ones such as the Ca 5. I suspect that your drawing is correct but looking for such tiny features on grainy photos is a bit of a challenge.

Stephen.

Is that what I can see on the outer struts here?:



Richard
Hendon for flying - the fastest way to the ground!

Offline Alexis

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6999
  • Love the self
Re: C.O.W Biplane 1912
« Reply #20 on: March 06, 2020, 11:45:33 AM »
Looks like you are going to have to hire a few more Spiders !



Terri
Hurra ! , Ich Leben Noch
Body and life is a vessel we use to travel the planet . Femininity is the gift , The miracle comes from what we do with it .

Offline lone modeller

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4264
Re: C.O.W Biplane 1912
« Reply #21 on: March 07, 2020, 07:59:34 AM »
Richard

Yes, the dark horizontal lines are bracing that hold the apex of the triangle. They are clearly visible on other photos of the Ca 5 and I represented them on my model with small pieces of stretched sprue. It looks as though the Cow machine may have had triangular bracing pieces instead of horizontal bars but if possible I would check that first.

I am not sure why the struts were braced in this way as I am not an engineer - perhaps one of our colleagues could cast light on this issue?

Stephen.

Online RLWP

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1396
  • Bodger
Re: C.O.W Biplane 1912
« Reply #22 on: March 07, 2020, 07:27:06 PM »
I have three conflicting drawings, only one shows those triangles. I have found the bars on something, probably a picture so I shall use those

I think the triangles are wires but I haven't found them in a picture - yet!

All good fun

Richard
Hendon for flying - the fastest way to the ground!

Online Borsos

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2715
Re: C.O.W Biplane 1912
« Reply #23 on: March 07, 2020, 08:19:25 PM »
Very fascinating project, like all of your scratch builds. Just out of interest: any idea how the interior might have looked like?
Andreas
"Deux armées aux prises, c'est une grande armée qui se suicide."
Barbusse.
"Ein Berg in Deutschland kann doch einen Berg in Frankreich nicht beleidigen. Oder ein Fluß oder ein Wald oder ein Weizenfeld."
Remarque.

Online RLWP

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1396
  • Bodger
Re: C.O.W Biplane 1912
« Reply #24 on: March 07, 2020, 08:29:56 PM »
Very fascinating project, like all of your scratch builds. Just out of interest: any idea how the interior might have looked like?
Andreas

Approximately - no idea at all!

One of the drawings I found shows Deperdussin controls with a rudder bar, and the wheel can be seen here:



That picture also confirms the pilot on the left and that the seat is quite low. The drawing also shows a rough location for the control panel and seat, and possibly some pipes for the pulsometer

It must have had a hand air pump as the main tank is below the floor and there is a gravity tank. It must also have had some kind of fuel and probably air valves plus the standard Gnome controls.

I'll probably go with whatever was used on an early B.E.2

It has just occurred to me, the 1912 Military Aeroplane Competition may have specified what controls should be fitted - I wonder if I can find out?

Richard
Hendon for flying - the fastest way to the ground!

Online RLWP

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1396
  • Bodger
Re: C.O.W Biplane 1912
« Reply #25 on: March 12, 2020, 06:30:45 PM »
Some more progress:



Between the fuselage and the lower wing is the main fuel tank, with a large fairing covering it. That fairing shows how sometimes problems turn to your advantage

The fuselage was supported on six legs:



and that's how I was was thinking of making my model, but I couldn't see how to work the fairing in. It's quite a complicated shape, the top plan form is an arc at the front, a rectangle and a triangular tail. The bottom is more or less an elongated raindrop, curved over the top of the wing. Blending those together must have been - interesting

Then I had a thought. What if I made the fairing on it's own, suck it to the bottom of the fuselage and mounted the wing onto that? And that's what I did:



Instead of a wobbly problem, I had a nice, solid connection to the lower wing

Richard
Hendon for flying - the fastest way to the ground!

Offline RAGIII

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 16315
Re: C.O.W Biplane 1912
« Reply #26 on: March 13, 2020, 01:05:19 AM »
I Love watching how you guys handle your scratch building challenges. The fairing and lower wing section look awesome!
RAGIII
"A man has to know his limitations": Harry Callahan

"Don't slop it on" Lynda Geisler

Offline lone modeller

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4264
Re: C.O.W Biplane 1912
« Reply #27 on: March 13, 2020, 06:25:33 AM »
Simple solution to the problem: the outboard struts will simply add strength. Excellent example of scratch building.

I find it fascinating how problems can be solved by ruminating over them for a while, and then approaching them in a crab-wise manner.

Stephen

Offline Alexis

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6999
  • Love the self
Re: C.O.W Biplane 1912
« Reply #28 on: March 14, 2020, 10:17:55 PM »
Nice solid foundation to build on now , most excellent Richard . How do you get clean cuts on your brass tubing ? This is something I struggle with a few sizes .


Terri
Hurra ! , Ich Leben Noch
Body and life is a vessel we use to travel the planet . Femininity is the gift , The miracle comes from what we do with it .

Online RLWP

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1396
  • Bodger
Re: C.O.W Biplane 1912
« Reply #29 on: March 14, 2020, 11:28:03 PM »
Nice solid foundation to build on now , most excellent Richard . How do you get clean cuts on your brass tubing ? This is something I struggle with a few sizes .


Terri

Small diameters (up to about 1mm) I cut with a scalpel blade like this:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4o10w7aVmIk

(I can't remember how to embed a video on such an ancient forum software as this)

Larger ones get cut off in my Wolf Jahn watchmakers lathe

Richard
Hendon for flying - the fastest way to the ground!