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The Book Shelf => What's interesting to read => Topic started by: PJ Fisher on March 20, 2022, 01:39:02 AM

Title: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on March 20, 2022, 01:39:02 AM
Guynemer Scores Thirty-Fifth Victory
(from the Quebec Telegraph, 19 March 1917):


(https://i.imgur.com/LMNlDav.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (in the news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on March 21, 2022, 01:01:28 PM
Shower Bombs Upon Zebrugge; Great Air Battle in Alsace
(from The Day, New London, CT, 1916):


(https://i.imgur.com/B3ARIHu.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (in the news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on March 22, 2022, 04:46:36 AM
Five Dollars in GOLD Paid for Model Airplanes:
(from the Spokesman-Review; Spokane, Washington, 1916)


(https://i.imgur.com/6HijHQ6.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation in the news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on March 23, 2022, 02:24:43 AM
Flying High
(from the Sydney Morning Herald, 1914):


(https://i.imgur.com/qGun7Z6.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation in the news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on March 24, 2022, 12:56:49 AM
Zeppelins Bomb Paris
(from the Evening News, San Jose, 1915):


(https://i.imgur.com/Wd5qrfk.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation in the news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on March 25, 2022, 09:08:35 AM
Prince Freidrich Karl Shot Down By British
(from the Toronto World, 1917)


(https://i.imgur.com/SX7Loxa.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation in the news)
Post by: macsporran on March 25, 2022, 08:59:54 PM
A busy day in 1918 as can be seen from this extract from Communique 132 of the RFC. This was the penultimate communique before the RFC transitioned into the RAF.
A 'Bloody Paralyser' flew an 81/2 hour mission to bomb Cologne and 90,000 rounds were fired in ground attacks on enemy troops. Harvey and Moore in a Bristol Fighter knocked down an Albatros D.V amongst many other victories.
Great to hear the boot was on the other foot compared to a year earlier!
Sandy
Title: On this Day (WWI aviation in the news)
Post by: James on March 25, 2022, 11:00:08 PM
Thank you PJ for posting the newspaper clippings. Fascinating and insightful reads. Sandy, thanks for posting the communique. May I ask where you got that communique?

James
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on March 25, 2022, 11:11:14 PM
French Destroy Enemy Aircraft
(from the Toronto World, 1917):


(https://i.imgur.com/km8tpDz.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation in the news)
Post by: macsporran on March 26, 2022, 09:09:19 PM
Sandy, thanks for posting the communique. May I ask where you got that communique?
James

Excellent little book from Grub Street publishers - includes the weekly communiques from RFC HQ in France - known irreverently to RFC crews as 'Comic Cuts'!
S
Title: On this Day (WWI aviation in the news)
Post by: James on March 26, 2022, 10:04:29 PM
Sandy, thanks for posting the communique. May I ask where you got that communique?
James

Excellent little book from Grub Street publishers - includes the weekly communiques from RFC HQ in France - known irreverently to RFC crews as 'Comic Cuts'!
S

Sandy, thank you my friend. I will check it out now and see where I can find it.

James
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on March 27, 2022, 11:57:14 AM
Reports of Mysterious German Giants
(from the Cambridge Times, 1918):


(https://i.imgur.com/uXRLGWU.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on March 28, 2022, 06:05:51 AM
Royalty Under Fire Over Front
(from the Youngstown Vindicator, 1917):


(https://i.imgur.com/4Sg7cGX.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on March 29, 2022, 11:09:01 AM
Strafing near Suez
(from The Day, 1916):


(https://i.imgur.com/udWPE0r.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on March 30, 2022, 11:36:07 AM
Putnam Attains Ace Status
(from the Pittsburgh Press, 1918):


(https://i.imgur.com/dup2NpN.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on March 31, 2022, 11:24:04 AM
Beware of Female Spies!
(from the Spokane Daily Chronicle, 1918):


(https://i.imgur.com/3OTu23G.png) (https://i.imgur.com/QDeGBNB.jpg)
(poster printed in 1917)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on March 31, 2022, 11:42:10 PM
British 'Destroyers' top 150mph
(from the Lewiston Evening Journal, 31 March 1917):


(https://i.imgur.com/uzxKCN5.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on April 02, 2022, 12:00:35 AM
Introducing the Ilya Muromets
(from the Morning Leader, 1914):


(https://i.imgur.com/wXmmfcv.png)

For an idea of size, check out IanB's 1/72 in-progress build from 2017: https://forum.ww1aircraftmodels.com/index.php?topic=1903.0
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on April 03, 2022, 11:29:17 AM
This could almost have been an April Fool's post...
(from the Portsmouth Daily Times, 1917):


(https://i.imgur.com/MmjyidJ.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on April 04, 2022, 06:04:29 AM
Much Allied Aerial Activity
(from the Montreal Daily Mail, 1916):


(https://i.imgur.com/BFVpzct.png) (https://i.imgur.com/85CXwmO.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: Rookie on April 04, 2022, 06:26:07 PM
These newspaper articles are fun to read, please keep them coming PJ!

Willem
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on April 04, 2022, 11:37:42 PM
Glad to hear.  Will do!  Everyone else is welcome to contribute too.
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on April 05, 2022, 12:13:00 AM
Zeppelins Guided by Radio
(from Popular Science Monthly, 1918):


(https://i.imgur.com/MlNYdgh.png) (https://i.imgur.com/pwNnGgm.png)

Check out MoFo's amazing 3D-printed 1/350 Zepp model: https://forum.ww1aircraftmodels.com/index.php?topic=11834.msg221251#msg221251
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on April 06, 2022, 01:25:14 AM
Seaplane Saves Sinking Seaplane
(from the Montreal Gazette, 1916):


(https://i.imgur.com/cMkWwrO.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on April 07, 2022, 12:13:14 AM
Pégoud Captures Taube
(from the Lewiston Evening Journal, 1915):


(https://i.imgur.com/kd0hywH.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on April 07, 2022, 11:22:52 PM
Crashes in Cemetery Carrying Corpse in Coffin
(from the Paterson Press, 1914):


(https://i.imgur.com/mrXbKKr.png)
[/quote]
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on April 09, 2022, 12:05:37 AM
Battling Bird Men: Boelke, Immelman, Althaus, Pegoud, Guynemer, Garros, Warneford, Thaw, et al.
(from the Cayuga Chief, 1916):


(https://i.imgur.com/UgVgxft.png)(https://i.imgur.com/t9ZjCSZ.png)(https://i.imgur.com/3G28bfK.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on April 10, 2022, 06:57:23 AM
Fierce Week-end Fighting over France
(from the Morning Leader, 1916):


(https://i.imgur.com/uRmXboa.png) (https://i.imgur.com/sXNN7Ju.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on April 11, 2022, 03:36:45 AM
"Fast Eddie", one of America's top race-car drivers and future ace of aces, proposes an elite Aero Squadron comprising motor racers.
(from the Crawfordsville Review, 1917):


(https://i.imgur.com/Uj4eDBt.png)

Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on April 11, 2022, 11:33:38 PM
Fighting Fokkers
(from the Evening Independent, 11 April 1918)


(https://i.imgur.com/QpyVbzU.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on April 12, 2022, 08:51:42 PM
FIVE HUNDRED Zeppelins Ready to Raid
(from the Warsaw Daily Union, 1915):

(https://i.imgur.com/J7Yqid4.png)

******************************************************************************************************************

Field Marshall von Hindenburg Hit
(from the Windsor Record, 1918):

(https://i.imgur.com/oi5vTY8.png)

Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on April 13, 2022, 11:43:17 PM
The Canadian Call Answered by Collishaw?
(from the Montreal Daily Mail, 1915)


(https://i.imgur.com/nmc8NDV.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on April 15, 2022, 04:17:26 AM
US President's Son Joins Canadian Air Service:
(from the Post Express, 1917):


(https://i.imgur.com/Uov2XNz.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on April 15, 2022, 03:54:29 PM
Tryggve Gran's Amazing Story
The Antarctic explorer and advisor to the failed Scott Expedition, who was the first solo flyer across North Sea, joins the RFC after using fake name.  He allegedly shoots down Hermann Göring five months later; befriending him after war.
(from the Sunday Morning Star, 15 April 1917):

(https://i.imgur.com/KhbIya8.png)(https://i.imgur.com/xJ2RQwZ.png)
(Photograph published in his 1919 Memoir, '"Under Britisk Flag - Krigen 1914-1918"
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on April 16, 2022, 03:44:13 PM
German Zeppelins Successfully Bomb Chicken Coop
(from the Sydney Morning Herald, 1915):


(https://i.imgur.com/3oABrx6.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on April 18, 2022, 10:06:51 AM
Fate of a Gotha... and its Flying Canine Co-Pilot
(from the Sydney Mail, 1918):

(https://i.imgur.com/qp4pzKe.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on April 19, 2022, 12:35:39 AM
Fallen Figher Flown OUT of No-Man's Land
(from The Century, 1918)


(https://i.imgur.com/mjHptWj.png)(https://i.imgur.com/qBEuQwy.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: Rookie on April 19, 2022, 02:25:57 AM
What a great story!

Willem
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on April 20, 2022, 07:59:05 AM
Wonder if it actually happened...  I searched briefly further for 'Captian Jaumotte', but didn't find anything significant.  Good storytelling at least.
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on April 20, 2022, 08:11:12 AM
Legendary Flyer Garros is Captured! 
(from the Meriden Daily Journal, 1915)


(https://i.imgur.com/WDUJbcr.png)(https://i.imgur.com/C0KYOjL.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on April 21, 2022, 10:33:02 PM
Recalling a Duel in the Lafayette Flying Corps
After the war the narrator, Granville A. Pollock, became commanding officer of the NYPD Aviation Unit
(from the Toledo News-Bee, 1918):


(https://i.imgur.com/9G8F9EJ.png)
(https://i.imgur.com/MUbnbs9.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: macsporran on April 22, 2022, 06:58:24 AM
April 21 1918, of course saw the demise of a certain Rittmeister, but he was not the only German casualty by far as witnessed in this extract from the Casualty lists. A bad day for les sales Boches!
Sandy 
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: macsporran on April 22, 2022, 07:04:34 AM
Apologies to those who've seen this one before - but it is the one day of the year I can re-post it!
Sandy
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: Rookie on April 22, 2022, 07:29:18 AM
Hi Sandy, may I ask what book this listing is in?

Willem

P.s. I don't mind at all that you repost this wonderful model  ;)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: macsporran on April 22, 2022, 07:47:47 AM
Thanks, Willem
It's another Grub Street publication.
Cheers. S
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on April 23, 2022, 01:22:42 AM
Apologies to those who've seen this one before - but it is the one day of the year I can re-post it!
Sandy

Thanks for sharing this model of Richtofen's downed plane! News of his demise started trickling to the western press over the following days.  Here are two of the first to surface on this day in 1918.  More to follow tomorrow. 

From the Bonham Daily Favorite:

(https://i.imgur.com/Pp1XJcH.png)


From the Warsaw Daily Times:

(https://i.imgur.com/d8v7Hbh.png)(https://i.imgur.com/GdGohqR.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on April 24, 2022, 02:03:15 AM
Emerging Details on Richtofen's Demise
(from the Montreal Gazette, on this day in 1918):


(https://i.imgur.com/kg0cVeo.png)(https://i.imgur.com/S5a2vW3.png)(https://i.imgur.com/P3Oqynv.png)(https://i.imgur.com/geeGaOv.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on April 24, 2022, 04:11:44 PM
MEANWHILE IN MEXICO (Three Reports on the US Invasion...)

1. Your Tax Dollars At Work
(from The Day, 1916):

     (https://i.imgur.com/GEoKurG.png)


2. Aviator Bribes Firing Squad, Escapes Across Border Clinging to Boxcar (from Aerial Age Weekly, 26 April 1915):

     (https://i.imgur.com/Oiih9br.png)


3. American Bird-men Break Record (from the Ingomar Index, 27 April 1917):

     (https://i.imgur.com/qfgyb7o.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on April 25, 2022, 10:53:45 PM
Richtofen's Mis-Identified Mistress and Killer
They even publish the woman's home address!
(from the Berkeley Daily Gazette 1918):


(https://i.imgur.com/3aLGrGO.png) (https://i.imgur.com/gbKo9iv.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on April 27, 2022, 12:49:10 AM
Enjoy a Wine Tasting While Comfortably Watching Zeppelins Destroy Your Home:
(both from Aerial Age Weekly, 1915):


(https://i.imgur.com/a6VNHMkh.png)


(https://i.imgur.com/n08WjQT.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on April 27, 2022, 09:37:03 PM
Quirky Air-Service Lingo
(from the Woodville Republican, 1918)

(https://i.imgur.com/OK5n9Pm.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on April 29, 2022, 12:06:36 AM
'Chateau Joe' Recalls First Flight Over the Front
(from the Newark Sunday Call, 1918 {click to enlarge})


(https://i.imgur.com/w2Nk49O.jpg)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on April 30, 2022, 02:41:15 AM
Planning for Yankee Planes 'Over There'
(From the Troy Sunday Budget, 1917):


1. (https://i.imgur.com/e0HRmpI.png). 2.(https://i.imgur.com/kFcQN20.png)



3. (https://i.imgur.com/L0UAqPt.png). 
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on April 30, 2022, 09:33:25 PM
Fokker Fighting Tactics
(from Popular Mechanics, April 1916)


(https://i.imgur.com/fsGhT5i.png)(https://i.imgur.com/2qYvnhXl.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on May 01, 2022, 11:13:18 PM
Anyone Ever Heard of This Austrian 'Ace'?
(from the Washington Observer, 1918):


(https://i.imgur.com/5zvBjrL.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on May 03, 2022, 12:48:21 AM
Uncle Sam's Suicide Traps
(from the Meriden Daily Journal, 1916):


1. (https://i.imgur.com/43iZD7s.png) 2. (https://i.imgur.com/YyF6EsF.png)


3.(https://i.imgur.com/UjY75AG.png). 4. (https://i.imgur.com/cO8qhbhl.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on May 03, 2022, 11:53:36 PM
Brooklyn Boy Bags First Boche
(from the Toledo News-Bee, 1918; with a snippet about American ace J. A. Meissner (from Wikipedia):

"Piloting a French-made Nieuport 28, Meissner scored his first aerial victory over the Forêt De La Rappe on 2 May 1918; he was fortunate to survive, given the fabric was shredding off his top wing even as he scored. At any rate, the feat earned the Distinguished Service Cross and the Croix de Guerre."


(https://i.imgur.com/d7TSswB.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on May 04, 2022, 10:09:12 PM
Malone Missing
(from the Morning Leader, 1917)

Interesting anecdote on wikipedia how this Canadian ace rescued one of the pilots he downed from German artillery.  He himself would be dead just one week later. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Joseph_Malone


(https://i.imgur.com/nuoesXV.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on May 05, 2022, 10:56:32 PM
Raider of Loughborough Wrecked
Cited as the L20, technically this was Zeppelin LZ. 59.
(from the Glasgow Herald, 1916):


(https://i.imgur.com/ARHW4iq.png) (https://i.imgur.com/WrEcRve.png)(https://i.imgur.com/1NGqVpb.png)


And from the Gettysburg Times, 1916:
(https://i.imgur.com/Len0Q5T.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on May 07, 2022, 12:16:57 AM
French Ace Flachaire Flips For Americans 

This article assigned him 15 planes downed and forty unconfirmed victories, though it appears his official tally in the history books is only is eight https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georges_Flachaire).  He would again serve in the French military throughout all of WWII.

(from the Gazette Times):


(https://i.imgur.com/dWiZqx0.png) (https://i.imgur.com/VBEKc6Y.png) (https://i.imgur.com/pcF6QT5.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on May 08, 2022, 06:17:48 AM
The Art of Flying
(from Greenberg Daily Tribune):

(https://i.imgur.com/cE4gc8w.png)(https://i.imgur.com/oYjaWFa.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on May 09, 2022, 05:37:44 AM
Targeting Taubes
(from Popular Mechanics, May 1918):

(https://i.imgur.com/ECWrU7N.png) (https://i.imgur.com/d7H6nWQ.png)

p.s. Here's a link to the 2014 post by forum member 'andyw' of his CSM Taube: https://forum.ww1aircraftmodels.com/index.php?topic=4317.0
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: KiwiZac on May 09, 2022, 06:37:11 AM
I'd love to know the significance of the markings on the Taube - I'm not sure I've ever seen anything except national markings on them.
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on May 10, 2022, 02:18:57 AM
I'd love to know the significance of the markings on the Taube - I'm not sure I've ever seen anything except national markings on them.

I'm curious too, as I know little of German plane markings.  Wonder if maybe they were painted in by whomever published the photograph?
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on May 10, 2022, 02:21:42 AM
IT COULD HAPPEN TO YOU - Bird Attacks Model Airplane
(from the Sunday Chronicle, 1914):


(https://i.imgur.com/IkWlfTD.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on May 10, 2022, 08:14:08 PM
Brave Yankee Birds Abroad
(from the Toledo News-Bee 1916):


(https://i.imgur.com/XsA2fAb.png)(https://i.imgur.com/TW3RTUJ.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on May 11, 2022, 01:42:49 PM
'WORLD'S KILLING CHAMPIONSHIP'! 'Human Hawk' Navarre Challenges 'Man Falcon' Immelmann to an Air Duel...
This may just be the best headline of the entire war.
(from the Toledo News-Bee, 11 May 1915):


(https://i.imgur.com/aXINez3.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on May 14, 2022, 11:08:07 AM
Albert Ball is Missing
(from the Mount Airy News, 12 May 1917):


(https://i.imgur.com/33iYuEv.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on May 14, 2022, 11:22:27 AM
Captive Brit Dumps Unbelted Boche During Loop?
(from the Evening Tribune, 13 May 1916):

(https://i.imgur.com/jB6kmLX.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: Rookie on May 14, 2022, 01:39:57 PM
I really enjoy reading all these stories PJ!

Willem
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on May 15, 2022, 02:17:43 PM
I really enjoy reading all these stories PJ!

Glad to hear. I'm starting to understand how so many became enchanted by all these exploits right as they were happening.
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on May 15, 2022, 02:24:59 PM
Twin TKO: Two Duelers Fall to Earth Wrapped in Flames
(from the Evening Independent, 14 May 1918):

(https://i.imgur.com/NH9ZU46.png)
(https://i.imgur.com/AuZjYtl.png)
(https://i.imgur.com/L9G6LYT.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on May 15, 2022, 02:28:27 PM
Witness to Tragedy
(from the Washington Reporter, 15 May 1918):
(https://i.imgur.com/C67xb12.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: torbiorn on May 15, 2022, 07:21:22 PM
I really enjoy reading all these stories PJ!

Glad to hear. I'm starting to understand how so many became enchanted by all these exploits right as they were happening.
I’m not posting, but I read all of them -  thank you for taking the time.
I try to fold my mind into thinking flying was invented only a very few years ago when reading these snippets, but I don’t think I can bring up the sense of wonder people of the time must’ve had. Mixed with the insane danger of early aviation, even without someone shooting at you, must’ve made it an irresistable cocktail.
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: KiwiZac on May 16, 2022, 06:07:29 AM
I'm starting to understand how so many became enchanted by all these exploits right as they were happening.
Especially with the way the articles are written!
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on May 17, 2022, 01:10:53 PM
Louis Strange's Strange Legend
Though not mentioned here by name, almost every survey of WWI British aviation recalls this pilot's true tale. More details via wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_Strange
(from the Toronto World, 16 May 1915):


(https://i.imgur.com/M8qzc7m.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: Rookie on May 17, 2022, 02:08:50 PM
Nice find Paul!

Willem
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on May 18, 2022, 12:37:37 PM
American First
This front-page article from rural Oklahoma on 17 May 1918, unwittingly reports America's first aerial victory of the war (which occurred one month earlier).  A quote from the Wikipedia page on the 94th Aero Squadron tells the tale in hindsight: 

"On a cloudy Sunday morning, 14 April, an alert was given and Lieutenants Douglas Campbell and Alan F. Winslow took off. A few minutes later, two enemy aircraft were seen moving through some clouds, and after a brief combat, Lt Campbell shot down one of the enemy and Lt Winslow forced the other down out of control. Both crashed on the ground. These were the first American air combat victories of World War I."

P.S. The two headlines at the bottom of the clipping suggest that there was also plenty action happening on the homefront.
(from the Guthrie Daily Leader):

(https://i.imgur.com/ey8ojU3.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on May 19, 2022, 12:34:36 PM
Aerodrome Braggadocio After Fighting the 'Flying Circus'
(from the Bridgeport Evening Farmer, 18 May 1917):

(https://i.imgur.com/oFEv4Yh.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on May 19, 2022, 08:22:17 PM
Side-by-side Spotlights on High Society Aviators
Left: Theodore Marburg Jr. joined the RFC and nearly died on a recon mission in 1915 when his plane crashed and a wing strut pierced his knee. He became a one-legged flight instructor, and was imfamously denied entry to the US while attempting to procure a prosthetic replacement because he had previously sworn allegiance to the Crown in order to fight while the US maintained neutrality.  He married a baroness (shown below) and, after the war, attempted life as a cattle rancher.  He shot himself in the head after she abandoned him shortly thereafter.

Right: Elliott C. Cowdin, co-founding flyer of the Lafayette Escadrille at the late age of 30, became the first American to receive France's Medaille Militaire. However, the Escadrille's official historian later noted that his fellow pilots claimed 'Most of his flying was done in bars' and that he "obtained citations for work he had not done and victories he had not gained, by buying champagne for his Captains".  In early 1917 Cowdin was discharged for being unfit to fly.  His postwar years were spent playing polo and pursuing the playboy life. 

(from the Wauwatosa News, 19 May 1916). 


(https://i.imgur.com/ZPKnR49.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on May 20, 2022, 11:17:17 PM
The Art of Bombing
(from the Diamond Drill, Crystal Falls, Michigan, 20 May 1916):


(https://i.imgur.com/MOC4AiR.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on May 21, 2022, 08:20:03 AM
***BREAKING NEWS***
(from the Evening Edition of the West Virginian, 20 May 1918 [more headlines to follow tomorrow]):


(https://i.imgur.com/fZSAehW.png)
(https://i.imgur.com/btdP4nD.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on May 23, 2022, 01:18:50 PM
More on Lufery's Demise
(from the Hawaaian.Gazette):

(https://i.imgur.com/ROuVu9C.png)
(https://i.imgur.com/VQdlXUE.png)
(https://i.imgur.com/LE6jUtx.png) (https://i.imgur.com/KpGyFOV.png)


p.s. Here's a shoutout to forum member 'coyotemagic' and his 2012 1/48 scale build of Lufbery's Nieuport N111: https://forum.ww1aircraftmodels.com/index.php?topic=632.45
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on May 23, 2022, 03:20:19 PM
Triple Header: Two Aces and an Olympian
Today's first report features American Aviator Stephen Potter who was shot down in flames by a plane piloted by Friedrich Christiansen, the only seaplane pilot to earn the Pour le Merite.  The US Navy honored Potter in 1943 by christening a Fletcher-class destroyer in his name; it served beyond WWII, being mothballed in 1958.  Christiansen went on to join the Nazi Party and was ultimately imprisoned for war crimes; dying only two days after the USS Stephen Potter was officially scrapped.  The second report entwines the high-altitude victory of US athelete William H. Taylor, and the longwinded behind-the-lines victory of American ace David McKelvey Peterson, Flight Commander of the 95th Aero Squadron.  Peterson died in a flying mishap just four months after the armistice.

(from the New York Tribune, 23 May 1918):

(https://i.imgur.com/kxyk012.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on May 25, 2022, 01:53:19 AM
First Blood: Austrian Airplanes Attack Arsenal, Ancoma and along Adriatic
The first fighting between Austria and Italy occurred on this day in 1915 with coordinated bombing, though little damage occurred.  Upon entering the conflict Italy had only 86 airplanes and 70 pilots at the ready; by war's end they had produced about 12,000 aircraft.
(from the Toledo News-Bee, 24 May 1915):

(https://i.imgur.com/E4gI3eo.png)
(https://i.imgur.com/Xjpr4bH.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on May 26, 2022, 03:26:49 AM
Men vs. Machines
Two incidents, a year apart, prove reminders that sometimes an airman's greatest foe was his own airplane and mechanical failure.  The first involves two slightly differing dispatches about the British rescue of two German 'aeroplanists' sent to sea by engine trouble (respectively from the Star-Independent and the Perth Amboy Evening News, 1915):

(https://i.imgur.com/fka0FWdl.png) (https://i.imgur.com/7nwn1Hul.png)


The second reports on how Bert Hall, of the Lafayette Escadrille, managed to fell a German plane after his own propeller started to fail, causing him to descend.  Hall's backstory is interesting- he flew for the Sultan of Turkey against Bulgaria, barnstormed through Ukraine, and served with the French Foreign Legion in Morocco... all before the Great War.  More on his adventurous life here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bert_Hall
(from the New Britain Herald, 1916):

(https://i.imgur.com/m0tEZcC.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on May 27, 2022, 09:52:32 AM
Guynemer - Boy Hero of France
An early American article focusing on France's newfound fascination with this legendary ace.
(from the Klamath Falls Evening Herald, 26 May 1916):

(https://i.imgur.com/RNwUUvx.png)(https://i.imgur.com/j9TEHyN.png)

p.s. Here's a shout-out to rfindly who shared his 2020 1/48 scale build of the Nieuport Ni11, which Guynemer would have been flying at time this article was published: https://forum.ww1aircraftmodels.com/index.php?topic=11688.msg217829#msg217829
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on May 27, 2022, 10:16:20 PM
Giving Up 3.5 Miles Up?
Tales of derring-do brought to you by the Toronto World (from 27 May 1918):

(https://i.imgur.com/EmVTPRt.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on May 29, 2022, 01:12:27 AM
Navarre et Navarre - Twin Eagles Fighting For France
It is seldom remembered that the great French ace Jean Navarre's twin brother, Pierre, also flew in the Aéronautique Militaire.
     (https://i.imgur.com/yctv69Dm.png)

This great read (from the Washington Sunday Star, 28 May 1916) shares their exploits and documents Pierre's hospital recovery following wounds sustained during an aerial victory while piloting a Nieuport 11 Bébé with Escadrille Spa.69. For this action he earned the Médaille militaire with the citation, "Le 8 mars 1916, a attaqué successivement à bout portant deux avions ennemis et a forcé le premier a atterrir précipitamment : au cours du second combat, a reçu trois blessures graves".  The Frères Navarre seemed destined to become twin aces, but Pierre would be dead only 6th months later from a solo flying accident... the same manner in which Jean would die three years later:

     (https://i.imgur.com/8ktprIQ.png)

Sidebar:
The newspaper image of the American Ambulance Hospital depicts a man standing aside Jean Navarre bearing an uncanny resemblance to a young Ernest Hemingway, who served as an ambulance driver on the Western Front; however, a quick study suggests the dates and locations do not align.
     (https://i.imgur.com/Z80kqcet.png)   (https://i.imgur.com/1RrPxiwt.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on May 29, 2022, 11:39:48 PM
A Busy Day Up in the Skies
(from the Deseret News, 1918)

(https://i.imgur.com/HlXvEch.png) (https://i.imgur.com/oxcJoB4.png)
(https://i.imgur.com/85jzKEc.png)(https://i.imgur.com/0EJwlbF.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on May 31, 2022, 01:05:09 AM
In Memoriam

Nine million combat personnel died during the Great War.  Five million civilians died from military operations, occupation, hunger, and disease.  Those events directly shaped this world we now share, and the model aircraft we build are miniature mementos of our collective human experience from part of that conflict.  Today the United States honors its fallen veterans by celebrating Memorial Day.  This simple two-sentence article offers a fitting parallel, as it tells of soldiers using an airplane's remnants to mark the final resting place of a lost comrade - a memorial happening in real time.  His name is unknown, but he is remembered.

(from the Richmond Palladium and Sun-Telegram, 29 May 1918):

(https://i.imgur.com/DzfabgT.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on May 31, 2022, 10:51:36 PM
French Penguins Learn to Fly
(from Popular Science, June 1918):


(https://i.imgur.com/ZxBzV48.png)  (https://i.imgur.com/C8V0Zdj.png)

p.s. Here's a shout-out to forum member 'lone modeller', who shared his 1/72 build of a Bleriot 'penguin' back in 2014: https://forum.ww1aircraftmodels.com/index.php?topic=3216.msg53954#msg53954
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on June 01, 2022, 02:43:35 PM
When Penguins Become Hawks
(from Popular Science, June 1916):


(https://i.imgur.com/rkl0ylj.png) (https://i.imgur.com/EX7PMKt.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on June 02, 2022, 11:12:09 PM
Fighting in the French Fashion
(from the Twin City Star, 1918)


(https://i.imgur.com/xKqyY8Y.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on June 05, 2022, 01:49:05 PM
Count Baracca 'Drops' Thirty-Two Planes

From 3 June 1918 regarding Italy's Ace of Aces and the man who inspired Ferrari's famous logo.  In the mere sixteen days he has left to live he will down two more enemy planes.  A memorial still stands on the site where his body, reportedly with his pistol unholstered and a bullet in his brain, was found a few yards from his wrecked plane. More details here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Francesco_Baracca
(from the Portsmouth Daily Times):

(https://i.imgur.com/awQneQ7.png)

p.s. Here's a shout-out to forum member 'Andolio64' and his 1/32 scale build of Baracca's Nieuport Ni17 from 2015: https://forum.ww1aircraftmodels.com/index.php?topic=4255.msg93488#msg93488
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on June 05, 2022, 01:57:09 PM
Blackout in the City that Never Sleeps
(from the Seattle Star, 4 June 1918)

(https://i.imgur.com/5Ocadojh.png)
(https://i.imgur.com/wBMeXtRh.png) (https://i.imgur.com/JsjWrKCh.png)

(https://i.imgur.com/LWwGSXJh.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on June 05, 2022, 02:56:19 PM
Spotlight: Roy Brown, "Von Richtofen's Vanquisher"...

...or so he was credited officially by the Royal Air Force, despite his own combat report calling the confrontation 'indecisive'.  Y'all know the rest. At the time of this publication, Brown had been recently released from hospital having recovering from influenza and nervous exhaustion. He will be assigned aerial instruction duties at Maerske Aerodrome until mid July when an airplane crash will return him to the hospital for another five months.
(from the Calgary Daily Herald, June 1918):

(https://i.imgur.com/OMbFAKjh.png)

p.s. It turns out that, in 2016, Roy Brown's cremated remains were reinterred in the Toronto Necropolis; just seven blocks from my apartment.  I recently strolled over and found his new headstone near the main entrance.
(https://i.imgur.com/daV8ZKj.jpg)

p.p.s. Check out forum member squiffy's 2014 build of Roy Brown's Camel B7270: https://forum.ww1aircraftmodels.com/index.php?topic=645.msg83990#msg83990
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on June 06, 2022, 02:39:55 PM
Spotlight: George McCubbin, "Vanquisher of Immelmann"...

Here's a short photo-story on the 18-year-old boy who felled one of the great pioneers of aerial combat, taken while McCubbin was on furlough in South Africa nearly a year after the incident which earned him a DSO (though his name would be censored initially).  More on Immelmann's demise to appear in the near future.  Has anyone here built a model of McCubbin's plane?

(from the Sydney Mail, 6 June 1917):

(https://i.imgur.com/FrAk8Gi.png)

Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on June 07, 2022, 10:36:04 PM
Talk of Italian Trimotor
Interesting short read on what must be the Caproni Ca.2/Ca.3.  The storyline credits the original article as having been penned over a week prior, but this version was published on this day, 7 June 1915, by the Evening Star.

(https://i.imgur.com/X83Z9vc.png)

p.s. Bringing this old tale to life is the 1/72 scale diorama shared by forum member 'maulaula' in 2015, which shows not one but two Ca.3's at roost:
https://forum.ww1aircraftmodels.com/index.php?topic=5177.msg91458#msg91458
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: Rookie on June 08, 2022, 08:14:36 AM
Let's not forget Ron Kootje's beautiful scratch build!

https://forum.ww1aircraftmodels.com/index.php?topic=533.0

Willem
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on June 08, 2022, 01:07:07 PM
Let's not forget Ron Kootje's beautiful scratch build!

Willem


Masterpiece
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on June 08, 2022, 02:47:38 PM
ATTACK OF THE EINDEKKERS
News of Germany's supremacy in tactics and technology over the front spread around the world while the 'Fokker Scourge' was happening.  Interesting to read here the mention of 'inherent stability'.  It was a goal of early aeroplane design theory, and a particular triumph of de Havilland's BE.2 series of planes that entered service way back in 1912.  Its very success in being a stable platform for reconnaissance became the BE's downfall by mid 1915... and the British kept them flying long after that.

(from the Oxnard Daily Courier, 8 June 1916):

(https://i.imgur.com/RG3mAdn.png) (https://i.imgur.com/5O2refg.png)(https://i.imgur.com/8yGFQnH.png)

p.s. For a trip down memory lane, here's a link to the 2012 thread featuring everyone's eindekker builds: https://forum.ww1aircraftmodels.com/index.php?topic=646.0
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on June 09, 2022, 02:10:38 PM
Extraordinary Ordinance
Anyone know which plane might have dropped this bomb?  Gotha?
(from the Spokesman-Review, 9 June 1918):

(https://i.imgur.com/cUYaz8c.png)

p.s. For anyone interested, here's a recent report on how they are still discovering finding unexploded bombs in France over100 years later: https://youtu.be/YNIBE64CAgs
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on June 11, 2022, 12:51:24 AM
Fallen German Fliers
Here's a interesting inventory of top German aces and their kill counts.  I wonder how these match up with the officially credited victories today?
(from the Spokesman-Review, 10 June 1918):


(https://i.imgur.com/tl6bSx5.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on June 13, 2022, 04:13:48 AM
Risk Lives.  No Rules.
(from the Washington Herald, 11 June 1916):

(https://i.imgur.com/MrCv99w.png) (https://i.imgur.com/k1QhWSJ.png) (https://i.imgur.com/iX7uEZf.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on June 13, 2022, 04:20:36 AM
Friendly Fire Fells Five Fliers in Fifty-Fighter Fray
(from the Spokesman Review, 12 June 1918):


(https://i.imgur.com/Agfv1Pl.png)(https://i.imgur.com/vIG5AJi.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on June 13, 2022, 11:19:32 PM
Frankreichs Kreigsflugzeuge (French Warplanes)
Here's an interesting early-war review of French aircraft (including Farmans, Caudrons, and Nieuports) and tactics found in a German-language newspaper published in Baltimore, Maryland.  The print is a bit faded... and in the old High German standard font... so good luck to those in need!

(from Der Deutsche Correspondent, 13 June 1915):

(https://i.imgur.com/rWCSt3n.png)
(https://i.imgur.com/NOfub6J.jpg)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on June 14, 2022, 05:40:40 PM
How Our Forefathers Did It

(from Boy's Life, June 1918):
(https://i.imgur.com/t5A7nZ7.png)(https://i.imgur.com/5dtKJEj.jpg)(https://i.imgur.com/KUP3laB.jpg)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on June 15, 2022, 03:27:56 PM
Operation Türkenkreuz
News of the deadliest bombing raid of WWI (and the first daylight raid over London), which occurred two days prior.  Over 100 planes involved. Details from wikipedia:

"An attack on 5 June was diverted to Sheerness in Kent due to a poor weather forecast but a third raid on 13 June, taking off at 10:00 a.m., was the first daylight raid on London. As there had been little planning, early attempts to intercept the Gothas were ineffective. In England, 92 aircraft took to the air but few were able to climb high enough to engage the bombers. A Bristol F.2 Fighter of 35 (Training) Squadron flown by Captain John Cole-Hamilton with Captain C. H. C. Keevil as the observer, attacked three Gothas over Ilford but Keevil was hit by return-fire and killed instantly. British anti-aircraft guns near the coast managed to hit the aircraft of Captain T. Grant of 39 Squadron, who made a forced-landing at Rochford. As the Gothas flew on the crews could see aircraft taking off from airfields as they approached, the air peppered with smoke from anti-aircraft fire. Beyond Southend, the formation was approached by a Sopwith Triplane (114 mph (183 km/h), time to 10,000 ft (3,000 m), ten minutes) which fired at too great a distance to have an effect. Near Ostend, a British formation was spotted and one fighter made a head-on attack on a Gotha which was then attacked by a Sopwith Camel from the rear, hitting the aircraft with gunfire before the combined fire of several Gothas drove off the British fighters.

The raid caused 162 deaths and 432 injuries. Among the dead were 18 children, killed by a bomb falling on the Upper North Street School primary school in Poplar. The reason for the relatively large numbers of casualties seems to have been public ignorance as to the threat posed by aerial bombardment in daylight. Lieutenant Charles Chabot, a RFC pilot on leave, recorded that: "...Raids hadn't become a very serious thing and everybody crowded out into the street to watch. They didn't take cover or dodge". This was the deadliest air raid of the war and no Gothas were lost. News of the raid was received enthusiastically in Germany and Brandenburg was summoned to Berlin to be awarded the Pour le Mérite, Germany's highest military honour. On taking off for the return journey, his aircraft had an [sic] failure; Brandenburg was severely injured and his pilot, Oberleutnant} Freiherr von Trotha, was killed."

(from the Youngstown Vindicator, 15 June 1917):
(https://i.imgur.com/uGyz3kv.png)
(https://i.imgur.com/o4zIDLv.png)
(https://i.imgur.com/CGPd5cn.png)

p.s. Check out this Roden model by malaula of a Gotha G.IV that participated in Operation Türkenkreuz: https://forum.ww1aircraftmodels.com/index.php?topic=6676.msg122423#msg122423
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: KiwiZac on June 16, 2022, 07:58:36 AM
It's fascinating to see a model depicting a piece of history as we read it - great detective work, PJ!
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on June 16, 2022, 10:23:18 PM
On Your Marks, Get Set, Go...
By the way, adjusted for inflation the prize money equals about $1,150!
(from the Youngstown Vindicator, 16 June 1915):

(https://i.imgur.com/RzqzrFc.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on June 18, 2022, 12:09:31 AM
Warneford Falls in France
News of his heroic deed spread fast.  He had single-handedly destroyed a Zeppelin (LZ37) by bombing it from above (in his Morane Saulnier Type L 'Parasol'). Warneford's victory boosted morale throughout the British Empire.  Then, only ten days later, he was dead.  He was just 23 years old.

(from the Daily Kennebac Journal, 17 June 1915):

(https://i.imgur.com/HGjwQvi.png)
(https://i.imgur.com/Sqi0Hsvm.jpg)(https://i.imgur.com/UJT85vB.jpg)

Check out rhallinger's 1/32 scale portrait miniature of Lt. Warneford: https://forum.ww1aircraftmodels.com/index.php?topic=11186.msg208744#msg208744
Along with his customized paper card model of Warneford's plane: https://forum.ww1aircraftmodels.com/index.php?topic=11062.msg204862#msg204862
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on June 18, 2022, 02:06:10 PM
Ghost Riders in the Sky
(from the Nevada Silver State, 18 June 1918):

(https://i.imgur.com/0HvNjdT.png)(https://i.imgur.com/oilqT4p.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on June 19, 2022, 11:24:00 PM
"They go Up Tiddly Up Up, They Go Down Tiddly Down Down..."

(from the Youngstown Vindicator, 19 June 1918):
(https://i.imgur.com/mJ83TS8.png)(https://i.imgur.com/avWMVWD.png)



Bonus for anyone who recognizes the headline: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UPgS26ZhqZs
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on June 20, 2022, 02:43:18 PM
Italian Plane Trounces Austrian Gun Float, Hollywood Style
(from the Youngstown Vindicator, 20 June 1918):


(https://i.imgur.com/Z6lsbzV.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on June 21, 2022, 02:18:36 PM
Japanese 'Ace' Jumps from Burning Plane at 9,000ft
You read it right.  Though the Japanese aviator Kobayashi Shukunosuke's ace status is unverified and unlikely, he did fight and fall (literally) for France over the Western Front.  He was posthumously awarded the Croix de Guerre. More info on the fledgling Imperial Japanese Army Airforce can be found here: https://en.w3we.com/wiki/Imperial_Japanese_Army_Air_Service
(Respectively from the Deseret News and the Montreal Gazette (21 June 1918), and the Herald of Asia (on 29 June):

(https://i.imgur.com/gTHT8l8.png) (https://i.imgur.com/rFk1Qcx.png) (https://i.imgur.com/Vulg7uj.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on June 22, 2022, 11:32:44 PM
Italy's top ace killed!  America's top ace Killed!  German Ace Loerzer Wounded!
A busy news day covering a bloody week.
(respectively from the Pittsburgh Press, the Toronto World, and the Morning Leader; 22 June 1918):


(https://i.imgur.com/oJGdB5a.png)

(https://i.imgur.com/jAl18Lw.png)

(https://i.imgur.com/CCM2duw.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on June 23, 2022, 02:45:53 PM
Whatever Works
(from the New York Tribune, 23 June 1918):


(https://i.imgur.com/17etBXI.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on June 25, 2022, 03:03:12 AM
Sikorsky Flees to France
Just one week after the Russian Provisional Government's failed attack on Germany, Igor Sikorsky, designer of the Ilya Murometz four-engine bomber, found himself in France, where he would continue his work as an aircraft engineer.  Within months after the Armistice he would emigrate to America and re-establish himself as a pioneer in aviation design.
(from the Calgary Daily Herald, 24 June 1918):

(https://i.imgur.com/Tad03od.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on June 26, 2022, 12:05:57 PM
"Girl" Aviator Shot Above Galicia
Though not named here, this news snippet notes one of the few female military pilots to see action in WWI. Nedeshda Degtereva also holds the distinction of becoming the first woman pilot to have been wounded in combat (as noted, while on a reconnaissance mission over the Austrian front in Galicia).
(from the St. Joseph News-Press, 1915):

(https://i.imgur.com/hGwYkuM.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on June 26, 2022, 02:48:49 PM
Italian Airman Wins Night Duel
(from the Pittsburg Press, 26 June 1918):
Any thoughts on who this pilot might have been?

(https://i.imgur.com/xrGeWsS.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on June 27, 2022, 11:47:30 PM
German Plane Bombs Baltimore
Theoretically at least... (the American press has a long history of tall tales and paranoia!).  Interestingly, they do cite the blackout that NYC actually experienced, which was reported here a few weeks back.
(From the Free Lance, July 1918).

(https://i.imgur.com/4mRKOZ3.png)(https://i.imgur.com/WCA4iXS.png)


(https://i.imgur.com/N3EiC5K.png)(https://i.imgur.com/kVLtE15.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on June 28, 2022, 10:32:05 PM
New French Plane
(from the Sydney Mail, 28 June 1916):

(https://i.imgur.com/y59RWd9.png)
(https://i.imgur.com/3GNtG1R.png)
(https://i.imgur.com/VWwwKs8.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: KiwiZac on June 29, 2022, 09:28:31 AM
Forgive my ignorance, all: what exactly is it? I don't recognise this machine.
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on June 29, 2022, 11:24:17 PM
Forgive my ignorance, all: what exactly is it? I don't recognise this machine.

I was wondering too.  Maybe a Dorand variant?  The article may be exaggerating; 140mph seems pretty fast for 1916.
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on June 29, 2022, 11:29:14 PM
Another Active Day Over the Western Front
(from the Gazette Times):

(https://i.imgur.com/49INpOo.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on June 30, 2022, 11:56:17 PM
Toffs Trek from Trenches to Turkish Baths and Back
"Oh! Oh! Oh! It's a lovely war..."
(from the Evening Record, 30 June 1916):

(https://i.imgur.com/GPd3WCR.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on July 01, 2022, 10:39:33 PM
Handley Page In Action
(From the New York Tribune, 1 July 1917):

(https://i.imgur.com/ysWIdNQ.png)(https://i.imgur.com/5DvEXk0.png) (https://i.imgur.com/8Ygayyh.png)(https://i.imgur.com/H868IR7.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: Rookie on July 02, 2022, 08:32:27 AM
Funny how they misspell  the name  ;)

Willem
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: KiwiZac on July 02, 2022, 08:44:19 AM
Funny how they misspell  the name  ;)

Willem
The amount of times I read "Messerschmidt" growing up...!
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on July 03, 2022, 05:57:58 AM
Vigorous Russians Victorious
Perhaps the legend is true... of the 85 or so of these bombers built throughout the war, only one was lost to enemy combat.
(from the Saskatoon Phoenix, 2 July 1917):

(https://i.imgur.com/C6xgsX7.png) (https://i.imgur.com/6aI0yF8.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on July 03, 2022, 09:27:21 PM
ATTENTION LADIES!  …and ‘EAGLETS’!
Now available - the latest summer fashion for 1917!
(from the Painesville Telegraph):

(https://i.imgur.com/c3MdIvl.png) (https://i.imgur.com/4t0gdYa.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on July 04, 2022, 09:58:21 PM
Spotlight: Eddie Rickenbacker
Here's a little excerpt on the exploits of America's Rising Star Aviator.

(https://i.imgur.com/oZbk45Z.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on July 06, 2022, 12:17:29 AM
Farman Hit 400 Times; Kept Flying!
(From Popular Science, July 1915):


(https://i.imgur.com/QPzOFqc.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on July 06, 2022, 10:46:06 PM
Genet's Grave
Edmond Charles Clinton Genet was the first US aviator die following America's entry into WWI.  Here are more details on his life and death (which occurred back in April) - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edmond_Genet
(from Popular Mechanics, July 1918)

(https://i.imgur.com/aU4ht5A.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on July 07, 2022, 10:54:44 PM
'Gimpers' Accuse 'Heinies' of Inflation
(from the Pittsburgh Press, 7 July 1917):

(https://i.imgur.com/CculYUK.png)(https://i.imgur.com/1t4kZpl.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on July 08, 2022, 02:08:29 PM
Chivalry for an Ace Who Survived Only Four Months
(from the Providence Evening Tribune, 8 July 1918):

(https://i.imgur.com/d8Qowv5.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on July 09, 2022, 03:29:35 PM
Italian Air Instructor Breaks Own Rules, Pays Ultimate Price
The story goes that he initiated a nosedive at just 300 feet but could not pull out in time.  He crashed on the same airfield later used by Amelia Earhart, Wiley Post, and where Charles Lindbergh would begin his legendary TransAtlantic solo flight in 1927. Gianfelice Gino's name lives on as the the honorary title of the Sons of Italy Lodge No. 878, in Freeland, Pennsylvania.

(from the Evening Tribune, July 1918, 1918):

(https://i.imgur.com/Eic8K1o.png) (https://i.imgur.com/B2HkKF4.jpg)
(Banner image from the History of Freeland, PA website)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on July 11, 2022, 06:32:38 AM
Fighting in the Air (part 1 of 2)
(from Popular Science, July 1917):

(https://i.imgur.com/8EEYVGp.png) (https://i.imgur.com/3E47xpL.png)
(to be continued tomorrow)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on July 11, 2022, 10:30:08 PM
Fighting in the Air (part 2 of 2)
(from Popular Science, July 1917):

(https://i.imgur.com/aXfoaZO.png) (https://i.imgur.com/1CJHtqB.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: Rookie on July 12, 2022, 03:10:43 AM
Very interesting articles Paul, thanks for posting them!

Willem
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on July 12, 2022, 03:17:42 AM
My pleasure. Glad others are enjoying too.
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on July 12, 2022, 11:26:52 PM
Spotlight: Guynemer vs. Boelcke
Check out the tweaked spandau he's using for a walking stick.
(From Popular Science, July 1917):

(https://i.imgur.com/Dzc6jvB.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on July 13, 2022, 02:29:19 PM
No Parachute? No Problem.
Simply act like a 'drunken man or little child' right when you're about to hit earth.
(from the Warsaw Daily Times, 13 July 1917):

(https://i.imgur.com/MoMkpak.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on July 15, 2022, 10:45:40 PM
Captured Illinois Airman Escapes Germans Five Times.  Brooklyn Ace's Tenth Victory.  French Squadron Commander Goes Missing. Romanian Airman Killed.
Host of updates today from the Sunday Star (14 July 1918):


(https://i.imgur.com/d6wG52V.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on July 16, 2022, 12:51:21 PM
Friendly Fire: Shot Down and Lived to Yell About It
WWI aviation histories commonly cite how, during the war's early years, soldiers on the ground would shoot at any anything flying overhead.  Here's an intriguing article confirming such incidents did occur.
(from the Roundup Record-Tribune, 16 July 1915):

(https://i.imgur.com/Y0xciUd.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on July 16, 2022, 03:11:30 PM
Hauptmann Wilhelm Reinhard Killed
Here's a snippet on the German ace and successor to Manfred von Richtofen as leader of Jagdgeschwader 1, who was killed during a test flight nearly two weeks earlier.  Isn't that how George Peppard met his end in the 'Blue Max'?
(from the Calgary Daily Herald, 16 July 1918):

(https://i.imgur.com/69rcmFa.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on July 17, 2022, 10:47:46 PM
Ruse de Guerre - Disguised German Airplanes Attack American Observation Balloon
(from the Easton Free Press, 17 July 1918):

(https://i.imgur.com/O3UNk5u.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on July 19, 2022, 06:31:20 AM
Action in the Dardanelles
Here are two possibly related stories from separate sources of allied travails in Turkey, featuring a needy Nieuport.
(respectively from the Macon Beacon and the Nome Daily Nugget, 18 June 1915):

(https://i.imgur.com/Cia8Dms.png)(https://i.imgur.com/0x15CcM.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on July 20, 2022, 02:03:27 AM
Mick Mannock Posthumously Awarded the Victoria Cross
Amazing post-script to this story from wikipedia:

"Mannock's Victoria Cross was presented to his father at Buckingham Palace in July 1919. Edward Mannock was also given his son's other medals, even though Mick had stipulated in his will that his father should receive nothing from his estate. Soon afterwards, Mannock's medals were sold for £5. They have since been recovered and are now owned by Lord Ashcroft; they are on loan to the Royal Air Force Museum at Hendon. The Death Plaque was sold by his niece in September 2014 for £26,400 to a private buyer".

(from the Glasgow Herald, 19 July 1919):

(https://i.imgur.com/ijGrZ2L.png)



p.s. Check out forum member ondra's 1/144th scale scratch-built model of Mannock's SE.5a: https://forum.ww1aircraftmodels.com/index.php?topic=8583.msg157996#msg157996
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on July 20, 2022, 11:47:08 PM
Entwined Airplanes Fall 6000 Feet; 'Vaccinated' Pilots Walk Away Unscathed
(from the Mitchell Capital, 20 July 1916):

(https://i.imgur.com/YnXtxML.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on July 21, 2022, 08:58:30 PM
Poor Sportsmanship?  Austrian Surrenders Mid Air, gets Escorted to Italian Aerodrome... Then Shot Down!
(from the Forest City Press, 21 July 1918):

(https://i.imgur.com/I0b3Yx6.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on July 23, 2022, 12:27:15 PM
Ballon Buster and Blue Max... Non-Combat Incidents Claim Two German Aces in Two Days

First to fall was Friedrich Friedrichs of Jasta 10.  Ranking among Germany's top-scoring balloon busters and a candidate for the Pour le Merite, Friedrichs met his fate after the incendiary bullets loaded on his Fokker DVII spontaneously caught fire. Though he parachuted, his harness became entangled with his plane's tail and Friedrich was dragged to his death.

Hans Kirschstein of Jasta 6 died the next day.  He received the Blue Max just three weeks before his demise as a passenger of a Hannover CL on a routine maintenance fight with an inexperienced pilot.  A remarkable dogfight involving Kirschstein occurred earlier in March 1918, when a lone AW FK.8 (piloted by Canadian 2nd Lt. Alan McLeod, with observer Lt. Arthur Hammond) encountered nine Fokker Triplanes. The duo shot down four Fokkers until Kirschtein strafed them thoroughly, setting the FK.8 aflame. The rest of the story via wikipedia:

McLeod instantly pushed her over into a very steep side-slip, but the flames were scorching him, and so he jumped out of his cockpit on to the left wing and crouched low, with the joystick pulled hard over in his right hand. Then he smashed a hole through the fabric in the fuselage so that he could reach the rudder-wire with his left hand, and so he guided her towards the lines. In this way he kept the flames away from his wounded observer and prevented the aircraft from burning up. When the machine finally crashed in No Man's Land, the young pilot, not minding his own injuries, dragged his comrade from the burning wreckage and under heavy fire carried him to comparative safety, before collapsing from exhaustion and loss of blood.

Hammond was wounded six times and ultimately lost a leg.  McLeod, wounded three times, earned the Victoria Cross. He returned to Manitoba to recuperate but soon died in the Influenza pandemic.


(from the Youngstown Vindicator, 22 July 1918):
(https://i.imgur.com/5Zg3rqv.png)

p.s. To underscore how bloody a war it was, note the unrelated story (upper left) of the Yank who had EIGHT horses shot from under him in one mission!

p.p.s.: Check out forum member RagIII's 1/32 build of Kirschstein's Dr.1: https://forum.ww1aircraftmodels.com/index.php?topic=2890.msg221667#msg221667
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on July 24, 2022, 04:47:48 AM
Who Knew?  Liberty V12 based on Mercedes Motor
(from the Forest City Press, July 1918):


(https://i.imgur.com/tkTxunx.png)

p.s. Here's a link to forum member PrzemoL's 2020 build of a Taurus 1/32 Liberty Engine for his AMC DH.9a: https://forum.ww1aircraftmodels.com/index.php?topic=11389.msg212250#msg212250
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on July 25, 2022, 01:42:09 AM
US Determines Bristol Fighter 'Overpowered' and 'Not of Military Value'
The War Department Bureau of Aircraft Production will instead focus on the S.E.5, the DH.4, and the Caproni.
(from the Washington Herald, 24 July 1918):

(https://i.imgur.com/DiTR8q8.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: KiwiZac on July 25, 2022, 07:40:57 AM
I like the idea of a USAS Biff in the DH.4 "Dutch Girl" scheme...
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on July 26, 2022, 12:54:09 AM
Critical Camels & Brindle Boy
Here's a little article on the demonstration of flying a Sopwith Camel off of a battlecruiser.
(from the Glasgow Herald, 25 July 1918):

(https://i.imgur.com/0tgiAqC.png)
(https://i.imgur.com/4dottR1.png)

p.s. Here's link to forum member Gisbod's 2017 build of a 1/32 WNW Ship's Camel: https://forum.ww1aircraftmodels.com/index.php?topic=8592.msg158076#msg158076
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on July 27, 2022, 09:25:54 AM
Balloon Busting Ace of Aces Willy Coppens Bags Three in One Day
More from Wikipedia:

"...Coppens' record was spectacular. Between April and October 1918 he was credited with destroying 34 German observation balloons and three airplanes, nearly as many victories as Belgium's other five aces combined. Unlike most fighter pilots of World War I, who used .303 caliber or 7.92 mm guns, Coppens used a larger bore 11 mm Vickers machine gun...".

(from the Montreal Gazette, 26 July 1918):

(https://i.imgur.com/CsOJIko.png)


p.s. check out forum member Lone Modeller's 1/72 build of Coppens' Hanriot HD.1 (converted from an Airfix Sopwith Camel way back in the 1970s): https://forum.ww1aircraftmodels.com/index.php?topic=9854.msg179621#msg179621

p.p.s. have a look also at MoFo's 3d-printed Drachen and observation baskets: https://forum.ww1aircraftmodels.com/index.php?topic=11808.msg239193#msg239193
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on July 27, 2022, 10:01:41 PM
Blue Max Felled by Rookie on First Combat Flight
Carl Menckhoff had 39 confirmed victories when he encountered neophyte Walter Avery over Ville Nueve Sur Fere.  Details from wikipedia:

During the ensuing dogfight, Menckhoff was shot down by American Lieutenant Walter Avery of the 95th Aero Squadron, United States Air Service. When Avery maneuvered onto Menckhoff's tail, the German ace cut his engine and dropped in a falling leaf pattern of zigzagging side-slips. Avery instantly did the same. When they recovered from the side-slips by switching their engines back on, Avery was in position to shoot Menckhoff down.

Captured by French troops at the crash site, Menckhoff was chagrined to learn that Avery was a rookie pilot on his first combat flight. Avery arrived at the crash site and respectfully refused to remove the Pour le Merite from Menckhoff's throat as a souvenir. Instead, Avery cut a fabric letter "M" from the crashed Fokker's covering as a keepsake before Menckhoff was led away by French soldiers.

Menckhoff remained a prisoner after the armistice, until he escaped to Switzerland and the safety of his in-law's castle (as one does).
(respectively from the Washington Reporter, Youngstown Vindicator, Meriden Daily Journal, Newburgh Daily News; 26-27 July, 1918):

(https://i.imgur.com/kQbJGzR.png) (https://i.imgur.com/mYEVTQF.png)(https://i.imgur.com/sDjNSDf.png) (https://i.imgur.com/2deToU0.png)


In an incredible coda to this story: nearly ninety years later in 2007, Avery's daughter discovered that Menckhoff's son lived nearby in Washington D.C.; in a small ceremony, she returned her father's war trophy (the fabric 'M' cut from his Fokker way back in 1918) to his heir.  Details here:   https://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2007/may/11/20070511-102739-7444r/
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on July 28, 2022, 02:29:24 PM
End of an Era
The Great War officially began today.  Austria declared against Serbia, which was immediately defended by Russia.  By week's end Germany, Britain and France would be drawn into the fray.  Soon, more nations would also take up arms (and aircraft) against each other. 

Pioneer pilots heeded the call to combat, ending overnight that romantic age of early aviation which was always fraught with risk, but maintained a certain sense of innocence.  However, mankind's fascination with conquering the skies continued in new directions.  Fittingly, I found two simple, side-by-side snippets that provide a poignant juxtaposition of the tragedy and triumph of two little boys who never knew each other but played out their passion for reaching the sky to the fullest on that last day before the dawn of war.  Tens of thousands of men will follow their alternate paths over the next four years.

(from the Bridgepoint Evening Farmer, 27 July 1914):

(https://i.imgur.com/Jp8PDyo.png)

Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on July 29, 2022, 11:07:16 PM
The First War in the Air
Here are two unrelated articles from day two of the Great War hinting at the potential impact of aircraft in the international conflict:
(from the Daily Gate City, 29 July 1914):

(https://i.imgur.com/LOJjGCY.png)
(https://i.imgur.com/r5x7Fr8.png)


(and from the Richmond Palladium & Sun Telegram, 29 July 1914):
(https://i.imgur.com/qSPDDFE.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on July 31, 2022, 05:17:23 AM
Battre le fer pendant qu’il est chaud!
(from the Evening World, 30 July 1914):

(https://i.imgur.com/pdOgwyH.png)

(https://i.imgur.com/8Fioexj.png)(https://i.imgur.com/4GLqnT6.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: jeroen_R90S on July 31, 2022, 06:01:10 AM
Checking in to let you know I really enjoy these snippets!
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on July 31, 2022, 11:36:08 PM
Glad to hear.  Finding them has been a fun journey for me.
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on August 01, 2022, 12:50:05 PM
The Curious Call of Netheraven
Just a few days before England entered the Great War, this charming little anecdote about a quirky Royal Flying Corps custom appeared in the papers.  I believe the aerodome at Salisbury Plain was home to Nos. 3&4 Squadrons immediately prior to mobilization.  Soon thereafter is became a training squadron for fledgling pilots.
(From the Dakota County Herald 30 July 1914):

(https://i.imgur.com/Ht3Jms4.png)

Here's pilot's-eye view of Netheraven taken just a few weeks before this article was published (from Flight, 5 June 1914):(https://i.imgur.com/4hlPenI.png)


Wondering if this old contraption might still exist over 100 years later I searched around and discovered that a similarly described gong was offered at auction back in 2009 for a mere £100-150.  I would totally have bought that!

(https://i.imgur.com/TBSia32.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: KiwiZac on August 02, 2022, 05:26:04 AM
Aww man, that would've been such a cool buy!
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on August 02, 2022, 12:58:35 PM
Spithead Royal Review

Following a tradition dating back to the 14th century and as mobilization to war, First Lord of the Admiralty Winston Churchill assembled Britain's Grand Fleet for review by King George V in the summer of 1914.  In what must then have been history's most grandiose flex of maritime muscle, hundreds of ships amassed, including: 55 Battleships, 4 Battle cruisers, 27 Cruisers, 28 Light cruisers, and 78 Destroyers.  Making this event extra special was the appearance of the RNAS armada of seventeen airplanes, including 9 Shorts, 7 Farmans, 2 Royal Aircraft Factory BE's, and a Sopwith Batboat.  Two airships also made an appearance. 

(from the Boston Evening Transcript, 1 August 1914 [Kudos to the newspaper man who had the audacity/foresight to place the 'undertaker & embalmers' advert alongside this military article]):

(https://i.imgur.com/D3QyZI7.png)


p.s. History really comes alive today thanks to an attic hunter who, last year, discovered and digitized some forgotten film footage of the 1914 Fleet Review.  It features one of the Short seaplanes (S.41) taxiing around.  The action starts at the 13 sec. mark: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cPgBszLCQb4

p.p.s. Here's an in-flight image of another Short at the Review (from Flight, 24 July 1914):
(https://i.imgur.com/JxSKvQK.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on August 02, 2022, 10:27:17 PM
U.S. Uses New Nieuports
(from The Day, 2 August 1917):

(https://i.imgur.com/de6F151.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on August 03, 2022, 11:03:23 PM
"THIS IS SURE DEATH"! "Whirlpool of Battle"! "First Duel in the Clouds"!
Sensational headlines mix fiction with fact today - particularly of the famous Roland Garros' false fiery death by ramming a Zeppelin. Garros did actually die in combat... one month before the war ended in 1918.
(respectively from the Seattle Star, the Washington Times, and the Daily Gate City, 3 August 1914):

(https://i.imgur.com/imDe6vG.png)
(https://i.imgur.com/nDNg6xq.png)
(https://i.imgur.com/malCgd9.png)

(https://i.imgur.com/SElZYJq.png)(https://i.imgur.com/u9mVz75.png)

(https://i.imgur.com/YuWFx8S.png)
(https://i.imgur.com/8oC0Yz1.png)

p.s. Check our forum member przemoL's 1/72nd scale AZ Model build of Garros' 1915 Morane L: https://forum.ww1aircraftmodels.com/index.php?topic=5219.msg92785#msg92785
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on August 05, 2022, 01:39:13 AM
First Bomb Drop of War
One of the first mentions of aerial bombs being deployed.
(from the El Paso Herald, 4 August 1914):

(https://i.imgur.com/alFeMXg.png)

Clearly the French were already at it too, though this contraption looks a bit dubious.
(from the Bridgeport Evening Farmer, 4 August 1914):
(https://i.imgur.com/HMSyMYN.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on August 05, 2022, 11:45:47 PM
And in this Corner...
Here's a brief synopsis of the belligerents' air power as of week one.
(from the Cairo Bulletin, 5 August 1914):

(https://i.imgur.com/La4h3Nm.png)


(and from the Watertown Weekly Leader, 4 August 1914):

(https://i.imgur.com/FatQWXg.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on August 06, 2022, 07:48:18 PM
Mystery Agent Claims Air Mastery
(from the Grand Forks Daily Herald, 6 August 1914):

(https://i.imgur.com/fL9vUYG.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on August 08, 2022, 01:13:45 AM
Airman's View Shared by Few
Taking a break from the sensationalist stories of the war's first week, this picturesque post describes the scenery still seen only by the smallest percentage of the population in those days.
(from the Evening Star, 7 August 1917)


(https://i.imgur.com/qVySnn8.png) (https://i.imgur.com/zwpEXmn.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on August 09, 2022, 11:47:44 AM
Albert Ball Posthumously Awarded the Victoria Cross
Word circled the world today of the London Gazette's July 22 announcement the Captain Ball had been awarded Britains highest honor for 'most conspicuous and consistent bravery'.
(from the Sydney Mail, 8 August 1917):

(https://i.imgur.com/iQurrDQ.png)


p.s. For anyone who may have missed it, check our forum member macsporran's recent 1/32 scale Special Hobby build depicting Albert Ball alongside his Nieuport XVI (his favorite mount): https://forum.ww1aircraftmodels.com/index.php?topic=13104.msg244306#msg244306
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on August 10, 2022, 12:19:22 AM
Ground Fire Sets Russian Aviators Aflame
(from the Montreal Daily Mail, 9 August 1916):


(https://i.imgur.com/qnWur6v.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on August 11, 2022, 07:26:57 AM
Turkish Aviator Sinks Allied Sub
This brief report appeared in a number of newspapers this week, though none offered further detail.  If this story is verified could it be the first sinking of a sub by an airplane?
(from the Washington Evening Star, 10 August 1915):

(https://i.imgur.com/ObxfOW1.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on August 11, 2022, 11:26:07 PM
Are You Fit to Fly?
(from the Middletown Transcripts, 11 Aug 1917):

(https://i.imgur.com/oEwGLqo.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on August 13, 2022, 09:03:15 AM
Dog is My Co-Pilot
(from the Turner County Herald, 12 August 1915):

(https://i.imgur.com/e5nt2gz.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on August 13, 2022, 02:15:46 PM
Bulletproof Birdman
Clipped ten times, his plane riddled with holes... but still completes mission.
(from the Spokesman-Review, 13 August 1918):

(https://i.imgur.com/OKOgYjL.png)

p.s. More details about this lucky day come from the book Montana & The Sky c/o the Internet Archive: 
 Harwood was assigned to the 12th Aero Squadron, flying in Salmson 8 observation aircraft...  Military records show that Benjamin P. Harwood exhibited extraordinary heroism in action near Chateau Thierry, France, on July 5, 1918. He volunteered as a gunner to fly protection for a photo airplane, at which time he engaged several enemy aircraft and, with his pilot, successfully protected the photo airplane, which was thereby able to accomplish the mission. Harwood was severely wounded in the engagement, but with the pilot was able to return to our lines despite the fact that their airplane had been riddled by enemy fire.  For this engagement Ft. Harwood received citations including the Distinguished Service Cross, the Croix de Guerre, the War Medal of the Aero Club of America, and the Purple Heart.
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on August 15, 2022, 07:11:19 AM
LEAGUE OF DEATH!  French Fight Club Suicide Squad
(from the Eugene Register-Guard, 14 August 1914):

(https://i.imgur.com/o2GQkB2.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on August 15, 2022, 03:00:44 PM
Cheaters Never Win
(from the Ludington Daily News, 15 August 1917):

(https://i.imgur.com/Gf4nboS.png) (https://i.imgur.com/urWH0oO.png) (https://i.imgur.com/CBjaNZj.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on August 17, 2022, 12:16:16 AM
The French and the Furious
(from the Carroll County Democrat, 16 August 1918):

(https://i.imgur.com/hJR9yZ1.png)

Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on August 18, 2022, 12:51:43 AM
"Archibald?  Certainly Not!"
Though 'archie', the British slang for anti-aircraft ordinance, hadn't yet become vernacular, here's an early article on its potential effectiveness in limiting air power. 
(from the Topeka Daily State Journal, 17 August 1914):

(https://i.imgur.com/fvmXPkU.png)


The term originates from the chorus of a song popular in pre-war music halls:
   “Archibald – certainly not
   Get back to work, sir, like a shot
   When single you could waste time spooning
   But lose work now for honeymooning
   Archibald – certainly not.”

For more backstory, check out this great WWI etymologist website:
https://languagesandthefirstworldwar.wordpress.com/2017/06/06/archibald-certainlynot/#:~:text=The%20widely%20accepted%20story%20is,by%20George%20Robey%20in%201911
(from Fraser and Gibbons, 'Soldier and Sailor Words and Phrases', 1925 [screenshot via Languages and the First World War):

(https://i.imgur.com/3NfTE9L.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on August 18, 2022, 09:26:13 PM
Noted German Fliers Killed
'Leo Wenhardt', the top ace listed here, is actually Erich Loewenhardt (Löwenhardt), Germany's third-highest-ranking ace of the war.  He was credited with 54 confirmed aerial victories and died the week before this article was published.
(from The Sun, 18 August 1918):

(https://i.imgur.com/AJ8lzwY.png)

More on Loewenhardt's last day from wikipedia:
"On the 10th, flying despite a badly sprained ankle, Loewenhardt launched his yellow Fokker D.VII on a mid-day sortie leading a patrol heavily weighted with rookie pilots. He encountered No. 56 Squadron RAF and shot down a Royal Aircraft Factory SE.5a over Chaulnes, France at 1215 hours for his 54th victory. In the aftermath of the combat, he collided with another German pilot, Leutnant Alfred Wenz from Jasta 11. Loewenhardt's Fokker's landing gear slammed the upper right wing on Wenz's D.VII. Both pilots' planes were equipped with parachutes and both pilots bailed out. Erich Loewenhardt's chute failed to open and he fell to his death."

p.s. Check out forum member RAGIII's 2013 WNW build of Löwenhardt's yellow fokker: https://forum.ww1aircraftmodels.com/index.php?topic=2454.0
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on August 19, 2022, 10:03:29 PM
Say Wha?
One pilot... four machine guns... what are the other fifteen tiny crew members doing?
(from the Abilene Weekly Reflector, 19 August 1915):

(https://i.imgur.com/F1gKU8f.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on August 21, 2022, 03:45:43 AM
Badass Brit Repeatedly Stands Aeroplane on Tail to Shoot Straight Up
(from the Tensas Gazette, 20 August 1915):


(https://i.imgur.com/e4HUumH.png) (https://i.imgur.com/XO0XFhE.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on August 21, 2022, 04:00:58 PM
Badass Frenchman Intentionally Loops Through Hail of Groundfire
(from the Adams County News, 21 August 1914):

(https://i.imgur.com/Dg6KSfH.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on August 23, 2022, 02:12:40 AM
Russian Rookie on First Flight Volplanes Across Lines with Dead Engine
(from the Adams County News, 22 August 1914):

(https://i.imgur.com/sBt51Jt.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on August 24, 2022, 12:28:42 AM
British Fleet's Seaplane Feat
Today we receive news of history's first successful (sort of) sinking a ship by an airplane using a torpedo, which occurred during the Gallipoli Campaign on 12 August 1915.  The pilot was Flight Commander Charles Edmonds (future Air Vice Marshall), of 3 Wing RNAS, flying the prototype Short 184 from the seaplane carrier HMS Ben-My-Chree.  It was later learned that the stricken Turkish troop transport had already been torpedoed by a British submarine's (HMS E14), so full credit could not be attributed; however, five days later, Edmonds successfully attacked another Turkish ship, the first to have been sunk entirely by this method.  More details from airwar1914-1918.wordpress.com:

“I glided down and fired my torpedo at the steamer from a height of about 14 feet and range of some 300 yards, with the sun astern of me. I noticed some flashes from the tug … so presumed she was firing at me and therefore kept on a westerly course, climbing rapidly. Looking back, I observed the track of the torpedo, which struck the ship abreast the mainmast, the starboard side. The explosion sent a column of water and large fragments of the ship almost as high as her masthead. The ship was about 5,000 tons displacement, painted black, with one funnel and four masts. She was lying close to the land, so cannot sink very far, but the force of the explosion was such that it is impossible for her to be of further use to the enemy.

The feat is all the more remarkable because the weight of the torpedo means that the Short Seaplane can only get into the air with a perfect combination of calm seas, light breezes and an engine running to its absolute limits, giving the aircraft an endurance of only about 45 minutes."

(from the Topeka State Journal, 23 August 1915):
(https://i.imgur.com/O3hugOK.png)

p.s. Check out forum member macsporran's 1/48 scale build of this exact plane (and its torpedo): https://forum.ww1aircraftmodels.com/index.php?topic=11403.msg212037#msg212037
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on August 24, 2022, 01:40:08 PM
Russian Diplomat Disses American Military Might
(from the San Jose Evening News, 24 August 1917):


(https://i.imgur.com/wC1Hm2D.png) (https://i.imgur.com/hfleNVL.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on August 25, 2022, 02:54:36 PM
Two British Airmen Awarded the Victoria Cross
First up is Britain's first-ever ace, Captain Lanoe Hawker, whose 'three kills in one day' feat, which he accomplished on 25 July 1915 while patrolling Passchendaele in Bristol Scout C #1611 (with a machine gun mounted at a 45° angle to avoid his propeller), was still a rare achievement in 1915.  Check out forum member przemoL's 1/72 scale MAC Distribution build of the Bristol that Hawker flew on this day: https://forum.ww1aircraftmodels.com/index.php?topic=3922.0.  Hawker fought until November 1916, when he was felled in a legendary dogfight with Manfred von Richtofen.
(from the Glasgow Herald, 25 August 1915):

(https://i.imgur.com/8qCcKly.png)


Next to be 'gazetted' is Captain John Aiden Liddell, who, on July 1915, was flying Royal Aircraft Factory RE.5 reconnaissance plane #2457 on his second-ever sortie over the German lines. Though RE.5s were not normally equipped for combat, on that day Liddell's observer, Second Lieutenant Richard Peck, loaded #2457 with a Lewis machine gun and spare service rifle.
(from the Supplement to the London Gazette, 20 August 1915):

(https://i.imgur.com/V8P0Uq7.png). (https://i.imgur.com/rPDUGRV.png)

The second photo below shows the mortally wounded Liddell being eased out of his plane by the ground crew of an allied aerodrome. Check out his tartan trousers, which must date to his previous service with the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders on the Western Front.  Ironically, though Liddell would be dead by month's end, #2457 survived the melee and remained in service as a Royal Flying Corps trainer into 1916. Liddell's medals were auctioned by Spink & Sons in 1997 for £85k and are now in the Lord Ashcroft Collection: https://www.lordashcroftmedals.com/collection/john-aidan-liddell-vc/(https://i.imgur.com/cPZwsq0.jpg) (https://i.imgur.com/R4YqtZn.jpg)


p.s. Here are some images of my 1/72 scale Roseplane vacuform build of this very plane (c. 2005):
(https://i.imgur.com/xg6nrEh.png)(https://i.imgur.com/DCQzxu7.jpg)(https://i.imgur.com/BuQDZMa.jpg)


More pics here if anyone cares to see: https://forum.ww1aircraftmodels.com/index.php?topic=13023.0
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: KiwiZac on August 26, 2022, 08:08:41 AM
A great way to add to the story, PJ - and a lovely model!
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on August 26, 2022, 10:08:52 AM
A great way to add to the story, PJ - and a lovely model!

Thanks man! It was a fun one to build.  Painted largely with layers of brushed pastels as I recall.  Sadly, it was accidentally destroyed by the cleaning lady a long time ago.
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on August 26, 2022, 02:57:49 PM
First US Army Air Service Aviator to Bag an Enemy Plane Gets Shot Down, Becomes POW

As noted here back in May, Alan Francis Winslow of 94th Aero Squadron partnered with fellow Hat-in-the-Ring-Gang flyer Lt Douglas Campbell (America's first ace) to share the first US Aviation Services air victories on April 14, when they respectively shot down an captured German airmen from Jasta 64w.  Details from http://roadstothegreatwar-ww1.blogspot.com:

On Sunday morning... they were on alert at Gengoult Aerodrome near Toul, France. German planes were reported in the area and the two U.S. pilots, completely inexperienced in aerial combat, took off in their Nieuport 28s. Almost immediately they saw two German aircraft and attacked them directly over the flying field at less than 1,000 feet altitude, in full view of not only the Americans at Gengoult Aerodrome but also the French citizens of Toul. Winslow shot down an Albatross D.V and a minute later Campbell destroyed a Pfalz D.III. They were both back on the ground in a matter of minutes. This initial fighter combat by the U.S. Air Service, although probably successful due as much to luck as skill, convinced the French people that the Americans were "super-human."

Winslow's superhuman status proved ephemeral when he ironically suffered the same fate just three months later.  He is erroneously reported below as an ace and having been killed, but Winslow actually survived the war as a prisoner and lived until 1933, whereas Campbell went on to greater fame and lived all the way up to 1990. 
(from the Urbana Daily Democrat, 26 August 1918):

(https://i.imgur.com/0XkWnEa.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on August 27, 2022, 03:00:46 PM
Italian Air Power
(from Aero & Hydro, 27 August 1914):

(https://i.imgur.com/nLn4knJ.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on August 28, 2022, 10:19:50 PM
Airplanes Useless
(from the Pittsburgh Free Press, 28 August 1914):

(https://i.imgur.com/rBHMKqv.png)(https://i.imgur.com/Z4kSLWo.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on August 29, 2022, 10:45:08 PM
Airships Waste of Money
A second day negative news on the impact of aviation in the war. 
(from the Glasgow Herald, August 1916):
(https://i.imgur.com/DlaVDkG.png)(https://i.imgur.com/ZJH5ZWg.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on August 31, 2022, 07:24:09 AM
Fast Fashion
French 'birdmen' strut in their summer furs.
(from the Topeka State Journal, 30 August 1916):

(https://i.imgur.com/FGl5YpW.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on September 02, 2022, 10:40:25 AM
England Urgently Increases Air Force
Just one month at war the scale of what will be needed comes into focus.
(from Aero & Hydro, 31 August 1914):

(https://i.imgur.com/L2UM3DL.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on September 02, 2022, 10:46:18 AM
Zeppelins Raid Coney Island in "Aerial Night Attack"!
Well, not really... but this must certainly be one of the first WW1 aircraft model dioramas ever built.
(from Popular Science Monthly, September 1916):

(https://i.imgur.com/5rhDnCc.png) (https://i.imgur.com/344HymZ.png) (https://i.imgur.com/nnuZRtW.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on September 02, 2022, 08:15:27 PM
The Teen-aged Grim Reaper
Grandson of a Serbian prime minister, Pierre Marinovich gained ace status at age 18 and was ultimately credited with twenty-one confirmed aerial victories. The Parisien primarily flew with the "Reapers" of Escadrille No. 94. It's possible that the downed 'prince' referred to in this article was German ace Harry von Bülow-Bothkamp, who was P.O.W.'ed in July 1918, but lived to become an ace all over again serving with the Luftwaffe in WWII.  In contrast, Marinovich, like so many aces to survive the Great War died soon thereafter in a flying accident.  Almost seems cliché.  His body is entombed in Père Lachaise Cemetery not far from Chopin, Modigliani, Oscar Wilde, Sarah Bernhardt, and Jim Morrison.
(from the Grand Forks Herald, 2 September 1918):

(https://i.imgur.com/yXc2zx6.png) (https://i.imgur.com/2OCjV97.jpg)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on September 03, 2022, 09:25:55 PM
Spotlight: Fighting Three-Deckers
(from Popular Science, September 1918):

(https://i.imgur.com/SsM5rfW.png).(https://i.imgur.com/JjPdel1.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on September 04, 2022, 08:32:16 PM
Revered Role: Seaplanes Seek Submarines
(fromo the Toronto World, 4 September 1915):

(https://i.imgur.com/clZ4kd0.png).(https://i.imgur.com/T0Deor5.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: macsporran on September 04, 2022, 11:38:42 PM
I'm glad Carl Dienstbach mentions an 'airhole' since it's pretty obvious he's mostly talking out of his own airhole regarding the 'fast' (!) Triplane with it's streamlined disk wheels!
Sandy
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on September 05, 2022, 12:27:33 PM
Hahahaha
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on September 06, 2022, 07:27:35 PM
Reversed Role: Submarine Sinks Seaplane
(from the Boston Evening Transcript, 5 September 1914):

(https://i.imgur.com/nH9zjdC.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on September 07, 2022, 04:15:02 AM
Electrified Lewis Gun
(from the Carlisle Independent, 6 September 1917):

(https://i.imgur.com/OJpK419.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on September 08, 2022, 12:01:59 AM
Top Ace's Low Point
That time Billy Bishop crashed through the roof of someone's home and landed in their living room...
(from the Prescott Journal Miner, 7 September 1918):


 (https://i.imgur.com/Fsf1aql.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on September 08, 2022, 11:19:52 PM
Luftstreitkräfte Anticipates American Army Air Service
(from the Evening Independent, 8 September 1918):

(https://i.imgur.com/jLD3VWA.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on September 10, 2022, 03:46:35 AM
Russian Rams Austrian Albatros in First Ever Aerial Combat Victory
Major news today from the eastern front where Pyotr Nikolayevich Nesterov (the pioneer aviator and reputedly one of the first to loop the loop), rammed an enemy plane head on.  The historic event, which occurred on August 25, is believed to be the first air victory though it resulted in the death of all involved when their wrecked planes tumbled to earth.  Details from wikipedia:

During the Battle of Galicia on 25 August 1914 (by the Old Style calendar still used in Russia), after trying various methods on previous occasions unsuccessfully, he used his Morane-Saulnier Type G (s/n 281) to ram the Austrian Albatros B.II reconnaissance aircraft of observer Baron Friedrich von Rosenthal and pilot Franz Malina from FLIK 11. Eager to destroy enemy aircraft, he probably intended to hit it with a glancing blow but damaged his own aircraft as much as the enemy's and both planes crashed. As was common for the time, Nesterov was not strapped in and he fell from his plane, dying of his injuries the next day. The Austrian pilot and observer also died. The town of Zhovkva (currently in Lviv Oblast, Ukraine), located near the battle, was renamed Nesterov in his honor in 1951.

(from the Spokane Daily Chronicle, 9 September 1914):

(https://i.imgur.com/I8D2erp.png) (https://i.imgur.com/aS98lyF.png)

p.s. check out forum member ianb's 1/72 build of the Amodel Nieuport IV, of the type Nesterov first looped in: https://forum.ww1aircraftmodels.com/index.php?topic=1198.msg18799#msg18799
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on September 10, 2022, 08:52:18 PM
Richtofen's Last Flight
(from the Evening World Daily Magazine, 10 September 1918):

(https://i.imgur.com/JlzxNcY.png)
(https://i.imgur.com/tqTtxiC.png)
(https://i.imgur.com/woPjhBn.png) (https://i.imgur.com/U5Jl91p.png) (https://i.imgur.com/xv4RjUX.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on September 12, 2022, 01:24:13 AM
'Music of Bullets' and Misinformed Chivalry
Today's headline announces the death of Harold Buckley Willis, flyer for the Lafayette Escadrille and the designer of their famous 'Sioux Warrior' insignia.  Willis was felled in aerial combat (likely by Lt. Wilhelm Schulz of Jasta 16b) on 18 August 1917. Like a scene out of a future Hollywood movie, word of the loss was exchanged between belligerents via messages dropped by lone airmen over rival aerodromes. The trouble with this poignant interaction?  Willis never died.  He reveals the true tale himself in a letter written within a Westphalian prison camp (c/o wikipedia):

"I will tell you how I happened to be the first in the Escadrille to be taken alive — a dubious distinction. We were protecting a group of bombing planes on a daylight raid some distance in enemy territory. Suddenly we were attacked by a rather energetic patrol of monoplaces, and a general mix up ensued. One of our planes in front of me was attacked and I was able to 'crock' the German — short lived satisfaction. The monoplace was protected by two others which in turn attacked me from behind riddling my machine. To continue in a straight line was fatal so I did a renversement and attacked — my only defense.

Immediately, of course, I was separated from our group, which continued. It would not have been so bad had my motor not been touched at the first volley. It worked only intermittently causing loss of height. We had a wild fight almost to the ground. I did all sorts of stunts to avoid fire on the line of flight. The enemy flew well. We missed collision twice by inches. I was badly raked by cross fire; music of bullets striking motor and cables. Toward the end my wind-shield was shattered and my goggles broken by a ball which slightly stunned me. I had an awful feeling of despair at the thought of the inevitable landing in Germany. As I neared the ground I had an instant's desire to dive into it — saw a wood in front of me, jumped it and landed instinctively on the crest of a hill. One of the Germans flew over me waved his hand turned and landed followed by his two comrades.

All saluted very politely as they came up — young chaps perfectly correct. My machine was a wreck thirty bullets in the fuselage motor and radiator exactly half of the cables cut tires punctured and wings riddled. It was a beautiful machine and had always served me well. Too bad!

The aviators took me to lunch at their quarters where I awaited a motor which took me to a prison in a fortress. One always expects to be either killed or wounded — never taken. So I had left the ground in two sweaters no coat and with no money. Confess I cried like a baby when I was finally alone in my cell. The first three days were terrible. One is not glad to be alive, especially when one wakes, forgets for a moment where one is, and then remembers. Pleasantest are the nights, for one always has vivid dreams of home or the Front. You can understand how wearing it is, to be helpless — a sort of living corpse — when there is need of every one. I try not to think of it."

Then, after fourteen months a prisoner and only five weeks before war's end, Willis escaped from captivity disguised as a German guard.  He crossed the Rhine and returned to Paris via Switzerland then returned to the front.  Willis subsequently served in WWII and lived until 1962.  His memoirs were recently published in 2019.

(from the South Bend News-Times, 11 September 1917):

(https://i.imgur.com/cSojyhJ.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on September 12, 2022, 10:22:51 PM
Dummy Bombs
Found this odd snippet illustrating the practice of 'bombing' (rather than shooting?) a stationery decoy plane strung between two cliffs.  Not sure why the military needed to conduct this experiment over a highway but my sympathy goes to the apparently oblivious family out for their Sunday drive in the motorcar directly beneath.
(from Popular Science Monthly, September 1916):

(https://i.imgur.com/v4gTjd0.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on September 13, 2022, 10:12:24 PM
Flying Freuline?
A possible precursor to the 'Night Witches' of WWII, this article recounts vaguely the discovery of a female flyer's body in the wreckage of a German plane.  News of a Russian female combat pilot, Nedeshda Degtereva, was posted here several weeks back.  Can anyone identify this pilot, or confirm this story?
(from the Eugene Register-Guard, 13 September 1918):

(https://i.imgur.com/wfXqhbg.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on September 15, 2022, 12:08:59 PM
French Ace Attacks Aviatik, Discovers Pistol Camera
Found, no less, by the legendary Jean Navarre.  Based available information, his discovery likely was made on 19 May 1916, when he shot down a German Aviatik C over Chattancourt, France.  This event also earned him the singular status of becoming the first Allied ace credited with 10 victories.
(from Popular Science Monthly, September 1916):

(https://i.imgur.com/cW8gmPA.png)

And here's an example of a similar gun discovered by the British a year later when, evidently, it was still considered rare enough to be newsworthy.
(from the Washington Times, 19 November 1917):

(https://i.imgur.com/Yd48c16.jpg)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on September 17, 2022, 08:49:33 AM
Used Planes for Sale!
(from the Aerial Age Weekly, 16 September 1919):

(https://i.imgur.com/ZDmguQw.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on September 18, 2022, 01:21:59 PM
British Find Yet Another Way to Keep B.E.2 Alive
Here's one more reincarnation (the 'E' in 'B.E.' stood for 'Experimental') of Geoffrey De Havilland's ancient brainchild that was birthed way back in the first weeks of 1912.  B.E.2 offspring remained operational into 1919.
(from Popular Science Monthly, September 2016):

(https://i.imgur.com/6cy7Zcu.png)

Bonus:  Here's some original motion picture footage of thus aircraft in action: https://youtu.be/qL0MyAX1a60
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on September 18, 2022, 09:52:24 PM
Canada Warns American Birdmen Not to Cross Border
(from the Spokane Spokesman-Review, 17 September 1914):

(https://i.imgur.com/B6aCkzV.png) (https://i.imgur.com/8JiDYHo.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on September 19, 2022, 10:57:15 AM
Londoners Advised to Keep Calm and 'Dodge' Bombs
(from the Boston Evening Transcript, 18 September 1918):

(https://i.imgur.com/cS96PhI.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on September 19, 2022, 11:36:35 PM
New Russian Record While RNAS Tanks German Trawlers
Two unrelated articles in today's issue of the Greensburg Daily Tribune (19 September 1917):

(https://i.imgur.com/l0940N7.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on September 21, 2022, 02:11:43 AM
Medusa Meets Charlie Chaplin
Here's an interesting picture story on early nose art.
(from the Illustrated War News, 20 September 1916):

(https://i.imgur.com/H3xPSoI.jpg)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on September 21, 2022, 09:45:51 PM
Punctuality Proves Fatal Flaw
(from the Meriden Daily Journal, 21 September 1918):

(https://i.imgur.com/KKMhBk8.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on September 22, 2022, 11:15:48 PM
Aeroplane Lights Army's Way
This early war article paints a vivid picture of how airplanes, before they became armed, were used for spotting and signalling.
(from the Easton Free Press, 22 September 1914):

(https://i.imgur.com/wpseXlf.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on September 23, 2022, 02:55:20 PM
No Occupation on Earth Compares
(from the Clinton Mirror, 23 September 1916):

(https://i.imgur.com/vKmbaHu.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on September 25, 2022, 01:16:28 AM
Austrian Aeronauts Swamp Sub then Rescue Entire Crew
Thrilling adventure in the Adriatic when two Lohner L flying boats spotted the French submarine Foucault of Cattaro (present day Kotor).
(from the Topeka State Journal, 24 September 1916):

(https://i.imgur.com/q84ZGJ0.png)

More from wikipedia:
"On 15 September 1916, while on patrol off Cattaro under the command of Lt. L. Devin, Foucault was spotted under the surface by two Austro-Hungarian Lohner L seaplanes. These were L132, flown by Lts. Konjovics and Sewera, and L135 (Lts. Zelezny and Klimburg). The two planes bombed Foucault, scoring hits which forced her to surface. Unable to dive and without power, Devin ordered her to be abandoned and scuttled. All her crew escaped without casualties. The seaplanes landed and took the crew prisoner, holding them until the arrival of an Austrian torpedo boat. This incident was the first instance of a submarine at sea being sunk by air attack."

History comes alive again here with forum member Tim Mixon's recent post on his 1/72 'Wings 72' vacuform build depicting one of the exact planes from this historic event: https://forum.ww1aircraftmodels.com/index.php?topic=13282.msg247190#msg247190
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on September 25, 2022, 03:01:36 PM
Fighting Big Guns with Wireless
(from Popular Science, September 1917):

(http://i.imgur.com/1iqpSPB.png) (https://imgur.com/1iqpSPB)
Click here for the full article: https://books.google.com/books?id=gikDAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA443&lpg=PA443&dq=%22hugh+battleplane%22&source=bl&ots=22Yv24_hEW&sig=ACfU3U0wANcY9KSnzIkn8ckYOuUknCkGUw&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiZ9sjhq7H6AhXtFFkFHSIVBcMQ6AF6BAgGEAM#v=onepage&q=%22hugh%20battleplane%22&f=false
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: Thumbs up on September 26, 2022, 06:18:20 AM
I would love to see a photo of Hugh Battleplane!
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on September 26, 2022, 11:55:56 AM
I would love to see a photo of Hugh Battleplane!

Me too!  I did search for that on flyingmachines.ru but no luck.  Another aviation mystery waiting to be solved.
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on September 26, 2022, 02:14:11 PM
Canadian Killed Fighting Zeppelin
(respectively from the Ottawa Journal and the Ottawa Citizen, 26 September 1917):
(https://i.imgur.com/zrvQcAA.png) (https://i.imgur.com/6DU08vM.jpg) (https://i.imgur.com/0KMQpMA.jpg)
(image c/o Canadian Virtual War Memorial)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on September 27, 2022, 11:01:26 PM
Italian Ace Tours America in Caproni Bomber
(from the St. Petersburg Daily, 27 September 1918):

(https://i.imgur.com/ui9Igpo.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on September 29, 2022, 12:10:07 AM
Kurt Wintgens Killed
Credited as the first fighter to shoot down an enemy aircraft with a synchronized gun, the Blue-Max recipient recalled the event in a letter excerpted in Cross & Cockade (Summer 1985):

"I had flown to the Front a couple of times without seeing an opponent, until yesterday evening when the big moment came. Time: 6:00 o'clock. Place: east of Lunéville. Altitude: between 2,000 and 2,500 m. Suddenly I notice a monoplane in front of me, about 300 m higher. And at the same moment he had already dived in front of me, fiercely firing his machine gun decently. But as I, at once, dived in an opposite direction under him, he missed wildly. After four attacks I reached his altitude in a large turn, and now my machine gun did some talking. I attacked at such a close distance that we looked each other into the face.  After my third attack he did the most stupid thing that he could do — he fled. I turned the crate on the spot and had him at once, beautifully, in my (gun)sight. Rapid fire for about four seconds, and down went his nose."

Wintgens is believed to have been shot down into no-man's land by French ace Alfred Heurteaux flying an early SPAD S.VII.
(respectively from the St. Joseph News-Press and the Glasgow Herald [somewhat blurred]; 28,29 September 1916):

(https://i.imgur.com/FiVX4y3.png). (https://i.imgur.com/94dZ9zN.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on September 29, 2022, 03:01:28 PM
German Giant Tricked into Trap at 20,00ft.
The plane in question is described as a Rumpler, but I wonder if this was a Friedrichshafen G.III?
(from the Saskatoon Phoenix, 29 September 1917):

(https://i.imgur.com/5zUUZ1d.png) (https://i.imgur.com/VVvRsk1.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on September 30, 2022, 11:47:50 PM
Inside a Death Chamber
(from the Fulton County News, 30 September 1916):

(https://i.imgur.com/cBayDq9.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on October 02, 2022, 01:46:58 PM
Lucky Charms
(from The Day, 1 October 1917):

(https://i.imgur.com/GGopU1I.png) (https://i.imgur.com/oikTf4Z.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on October 02, 2022, 10:27:46 PM
Building Warplanes 'Brings Out Good Qualities' in Kids
(respectively from the Oxnard Daily Courier and Popular Mechanics, October 1915):

(https://i.imgur.com/6XKm3KW.png) (https://i.imgur.com/iBuq4i2.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on October 04, 2022, 12:27:22 AM
Werner Voss Vanquished
Attacked by eight aces. Hits every oppponent.  An overview of his final patrol from wikipedia:

"Flying a silver-blue Fokker Dr.1, he singly fought James McCudden, Keith Muspratt, Harold A. Hamersley, Arthur Rhys Davids, Robert L. Chidlaw-Roberts, Geoffrey Hilton Bowman, Reginald Hoidge, and Richard Maybery. After he fell in solo opposition to those eight British aces after a dazzling display of aerobatics and gunnery that put bullets in his every opponent, he was described by his preeminent foe, Victoria Cross winner James McCudden, as "the bravest German airman". The pilot who actually killed Voss, Arthur Rhys-Davids, wished he had brought him down alive."

(from the Bisbee Daily News, 3 October 1917):

(https://i.imgur.com/3WON9IM.png).(https://i.imgur.com/xS99gsM.png).(https://i.imgur.com/6Qqbn6M.png)

p.s. Check out forum member crouthaj's 1/32nd scale build of the Fokker flown in Voss' final combat, alongside a signed Sanke card: https://forum.ww1aircraftmodels.com/index.php?topic=11271.msg209283#msg209283
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on October 05, 2022, 12:44:49 AM
'Speed Scouts' Exceed 175mph?
Maybe misconverted metrics, but a nice little spotlight on Nieuports.
(from Popular Mechanics, October 1917):

(https://i.imgur.com/Idyc0Ss.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on October 05, 2022, 11:50:14 PM
Splendid Gotha Design
(from Popular Mechanics, October 1917):

(https://i.imgur.com/atkQnuu.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on October 07, 2022, 06:06:25 AM
Ace Loewenhardt Confirmed Dead
Loewenhardt's loss was referenced in a recent article on German aces.  This article was published two months after he was reported missing.
(from the St. Petersburg Daily News, 6 October 1918):

(https://i.imgur.com/clLP7VP.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on October 08, 2022, 12:24:45 AM
World-Famous Aviator, Grahame-White, in 'Supreme Charge' of Aviation Strategy
Claude Grahame-White was a major influence in early British Aviation.  Trained to fly by Louis Bleriot himself, Grahame-White became the 6th aviator to be certified by the Royal Aero Club.  He won several early aero races and, during a 1910 trip to the US, landed his plane unannounced on the White House lawn.  Grahame-White established a flying school and airplane manufactory (now part of the RAF Museum) at Hendon outside London; the aerodrome was commandeered by the War Office in 1916.  In the first weeks of the conflict he flew the first night patrol mission against German raiders.  His private life, tinged with occasional scandal, was also regularly reported on.
(from the Telegraph Herald, 7 October 1914):

(https://i.imgur.com/dqEpJOo.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: KiwiZac on October 08, 2022, 09:23:11 AM
Splendid Gotha Design
I for one have always liked the G.IV above all other Gothas - splendid is a terrific term to describe it!
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on October 08, 2022, 10:54:27 PM
I for one have always liked the G.IV above all other Gothas - splendid is a terrific term to describe it!

I wonder if anyone's done a survey poll of which country produced overall the most elegant vs. ungainly aircraft.  I'd argue for France & Germany in the lead; Italy & Austria somewhere in the middle; Britain and Russia trailing.  USA = honorable mention.
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on October 09, 2022, 12:44:48 AM
Fritz Rumey Falls
The death of Germany's sixth-highest-scoring ace of the Great War received minor mention in the allied press this week in 1918.  One of only five pilots to have been awarded both the Pour le Mérite and the Prussian Militär-Verdienstkreuz (Military Merit Cross), in his last month of life Fritz Rumey shot down sixteen opponents. He was killed dogfighting over Neuville-Saint-Rémy on 27 September after his plane collided with an SE.5a flown by British ace Lieut. George Edgar Bruce Lawson. Rumey plunged to his death while his parachute failed to open.  Lawson was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross for this encounter, the citation for which read (c/o wikipedia):

"...he attacked fifteen Fokker biplanes that were harassing one of our bombing formations, driving down one in flames. He then engaged a second; in the combat the two machines collided, and the enemy aeroplane fell down completely out of control.  Although his machine was badly damaged, Lieutenant Lawson successfully regained our lines."

(respectively from the Daily Star, the Tägliche Omaha Tribüne, and the Alaska Daily Empire (Oct 8-9):

(https://i.imgur.com/XfOQ193.png).(https://i.imgur.com/typo0sM.png).(https://i.imgur.com/VZPlAzo.png)


Check out forum member Glenn Boss' newly minted 1/72-scale Eduard build of Fritz Rumey's colorful Albatros D.V, which was posted on the eve of the 104th anniversary of the Ace's death: https://forum.ww1aircraftmodels.com/index.php?topic=13365.msg248388#msg248388
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on October 09, 2022, 10:22:57 PM
Was is Das Für ein Groß Doppeldecker?
Und warum hat es drei flieger?
(from Popular Mechanics, October 1915):

(https://i.imgur.com/FXBMn0n.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on October 11, 2022, 12:06:39 AM
Work Hard, Play Hard
Here are two unrelated but insightful reports on the intense lifestyle of German Aviators on the Western Front.  First, we learn of their impressive six-to-one kill ratio (assisted by anti-aircraft fire).  Next, we hear of their demands for higher pay.  Intentional or not, the second snippet records that their complaint arises not from the high cost of living... but rather the 'cost of high living'!  Noch ein Bier, bitte!
(respectively from the Evening Star and the West Virginian, 10 October 1916):

(https://i.imgur.com/OoPCEYw.png)

(https://i.imgur.com/YPoHf80.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on October 11, 2022, 11:17:52 PM
Welcome to the Jungle
After being shot down in German-occupied Africa, this unlucky/lucky Irishman had to endure days of mosquitos, thorny underbrush, crocodiles and a lion... all while nursing three broken ribs and a fever!
(from the Vernon County Censor, 11 October 1916):

(https://i.imgur.com/ARg91rO.png).(https://i.imgur.com/nID8vCw.png).(https://i.imgur.com/9sD1irV.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on October 12, 2022, 11:02:53 PM
Shot in the Back. Blinded by Burst Propeller. A 'Perfect Hurricane' of Shrapnel.
And they all survived.
(from the Deseret News, 12 October 1915)

(https://i.imgur.com/WReqXXN.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on October 14, 2022, 12:18:15 AM
Lady Killer
Here are two spotlights on little-known aviatrix A. H. Heinrich, an American who flew for Italy during the war.  I'm not certain, but she appears to be posing possible in an American Burgess Type O 'Gunbus'.  Thirty-six of these were ordered by the Royal Naval Air Service; the first of which flew at Hendon in August 1915.  The plane was considered inferior with only a few relegated as trainers.  The rest went into storage, and evidently the last six were never even unpacked!
(respectively from the Iron County Register and Illustrated War News, 11-12 October 1916):

(https://i.imgur.com/DY4lY8p.png).(https://i.imgur.com/C5ZdFjT.jpg)


More derring-do in the news today features Alyn Bryant who gave up aviation for diving and aided in the Black Tom cleanup effort.  For those who aren't familiar with this event, it was one of the largest man-made non-nuclear explosions in history.  From wikipedia:

"The Black Tom explosion was an act of sabotage by agents of the German Empire, to destroy U.S.-made munitions that were to be supplied to the Allies in World War I. The explosions, which occurred on July 30, 1916, in New York Harbor, killed four people and destroyed some $20,000,000 ($500 million in 2022 dollars) worth of military goods. This incident, which happened prior to U.S. entry into World War I, also damaged the Statue of Liberty."

After this event the Statue of Liberty's torch was closed to the public for seventy years, only reopening after restoration in 1986.
(from the Imperial Valley Press, 13 October 1916):

(https://i.imgur.com/eG5vKqi.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on October 15, 2022, 01:30:20 PM
Burn or jump - what will you do?
In that era before standard parachutes, every flier must have pondered this dilemma whenever called to combat.  Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Mathy of the Kaiserliche Marine (Imperial German Navy) was forced to choose at 15,000 ft. over England on the first midnight of October 1916.  Mathy, veteran of more dirigible missions than any other airman, has been described as the 'most daring and audacious of all the Zeppelin raiders'.  Yet over time even he became understandably apprehensive.  "It is only a question of time before we join the rest", he once wrote.  "Everyone admits that they feel it. Our nerves are ruined by mistreatment.  If anyone should say that he was not haunted by visions of burning airships, then he would be a braggart." 

Mathy was commanding R-Class 'Super Zeppelin' LZ 72 (navy designation L 31) following a London incursion when he was spotted by Major Wulstan Joseph Tempest of the Royal Flying Corps.  Tempest was patrolling in his BE.2c as searchlights revealed Mathy's position fifteen miles away.  Tempest immediately pursued.  More on their fateful meeting (via wikipedia):

"As he [Tempest] approached his fuel tank pressure pump failed, and he was forced to use the hand pump to keep his engine operating.  He eventually closed with the airship, running the gauntlet of [British] anti-aircraft fire.  Approaching from the bows he fired a burst into her, then dived underneath firing another burst, seeing his incendiary bullets ripping through the airship's fabric skin, before turning to make another pass from the tail.  He momentarily saw a red glow illuminate the Zeppelin from within "like an enormous Chinese lantern" before flames erupted from the bows.  Tempest spun away to avoid being hit by flames and debris as the airship plunged to the ground, crashing at Potters Bar.  Exhausted by his exertions and the bitter cold Tempest crashed his aircraft on landing, cracking his skull against the butt of his machine gun.  The next day he travelled to Potters Bar to survey the wreck of L.31, but the area was cordoned off by the Army, and he was obliged to pay a shilling to see the wreckage from an adjoining farm."

Their encounter was reportedly witnessed by tens of thousands of Englanders.  As for Mathy's ultimate decision (via gwpd.org): "...his last act had been to leap clear of the falling inferno rather than wait for the crash.  His body was found some way from the wreckage of the ship, half-embedded in the corner of a field".  For further narrative, read this thrilling account (and inspiration for today's tagline) by Tom Morgan at hellfirecorner: http://www.hellfirecorner.co.uk/pottersbar/pottersbar.htm

Today's news records the King of England's honoring of Tempest's achievement; plus a front page featuring the wreckage of R-class Zeppelin LZ 76, which was downed over Essex a few days earlier (respectively from the Evening Star and the Pensacola Journal, 14 & 16 October 1916):

(https://i.imgur.com/mM0BupB.png)

(https://i.imgur.com/Odyxbua.png)

(https://i.imgur.com/EGF3VQv.png)
Bonus (above): an unknown artist's depiction of the moment of Mathy's dilemma while Tempest, simultaneously facing the same predicament, desperately evades the collapsing carnage.
Extra bonus: original film footage of both Zeppelin wrecks can be seen here: https://youtu.be/QjpfHOf2Fu0. 
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on October 15, 2022, 11:11:54 PM
100-Plane Battle Blocks Daylight
Report on a huge aerial action above the town of Obendorf-on-Neckar, home to the German arms manufacturer Mauser.
(from the Washington Herald, 15 October 1916):

(https://i.imgur.com/kl4QQ7t.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on October 17, 2022, 05:06:57 AM
Stars in the Sky
Spotlights on two American aces today.  The legendary Frank Luke (who was already dead when this story went to press) will reappear here in future articles; meanwhile, here's an incredible anecdote on the lesser-known but much-longer-lived Arthur Raymond Brooks (abbreviated from military-historyfandom.com): 

Circa 1985, Mr. Brooks (age 90), was visiting the National Air and Space Museum's restoration facility in Silver Hill, Maryland.  Upon entering a storage hangar as part of the tour, he spotted a tattered World War I vintage SPAD XIII airplane, the type he flew during the war.  As he drew nearer, he was astonished to discover it was his very aircraft.  He climbed into the cockpit and was immediately approached by a restoration technician who advised him in a very stern manner that these aircraft are delicate pieces of American history and visitors are not permitted to touch, much less sit in.  When Mr. Brooks explained that this was his airplane, the technician’s first thought was of a doddering old veteran, longing for the glory days of yesteryear.  While Mr. Brooks' speech and external mannerisms were befitting of a nonagenarian, his mind was as sharp as it was 30 or 40 years past.  He spoke to the technician as if reading from a history book about the last time this aircraft was in action over France.  Included in the lesson was the name and serial number of the plane, which was not readily visible.  The technician was aware of the aircraft's history and asked the old gentleman to stay right where he was while he summoned the NASM curator emeritus, Paul E. Garber.  Less than two years after this meeting, Ray Brooks' fully restored SPAD Smith IV was unveiled with great fanfare at the NASM's 'Great War in the Air' exhibit (Gallery 206).  Mr. Brooks was a guest of honor at the ribbon cutting ceremony.

(from the Spokane Daily Chronicle, 16 October 1918:

(https://i.imgur.com/yrwY00u.png) (https://i.imgur.com/QibRaVq.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on October 18, 2022, 10:06:23 AM
Bird Carcasses
Today we're treated to two unrelated pictorials showing the scavenged remnants of a German two-seater and a French R.E.P. monoplane.  These 'trophies' must still have been seen as novelties by ground troops during the conflict's opening months. 
(from Aero & Hydro, 17 October 1914):

(https://i.imgur.com/jEfRdiw.png) (https://i.imgur.com/h9SWL9M.png).


I've always been fond of the less-remembered clean-lined R.E.P., which was designed and produced by Robert Esnault-Pelterie, who also invented and patented the 'joystick' control column.  His parasol version was similar in span and horsepower to its contemporary competitor, the Morane-Saulnier L; however, the R.E.P. featured tubular steel construction of simplified triangular cross-section, which contributed to it weighing nearly 200 lbs. less.  If anyone cares to see, here's a 1/72 R.E.P. Parasol in R.N.A.S. livery that I scratch built back in 2004.  Had I been aware of this old news photo then, I would have approached the build differently.  In retrospect, my desperately low-budget attempt at scenery in the last image (simply dried dill from the kitchen spice rack sprinkled atop an upholstered chair seat photographed outdoors) doesn't look too bad.
 
(https://i.imgur.com/H2d0grk.png). (https://i.imgur.com/ZrzNDTt.jpg)

Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on October 19, 2022, 10:52:10 AM
What Goes Up...
(from Popular Science, October 1918):

(https://i.imgur.com/hfMGgpQ.jpg)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on October 20, 2022, 12:03:28 AM
World-Famous Aviator, Grahame-White, Executed for Espionage
He was a regular subject of the British Tabloids and was just reported on here ten days prior in a 1914 article noting his role in developing British Air Strategy.
(respectively from the Rochester Sentinel and the Evening News 18-19 October 1915):

(https://i.imgur.com/bjBJTMi.png).(https://i.imgur.com/ITyevdo.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: torbiorn on October 20, 2022, 01:58:10 AM
He wasn’t though, he passed away in Nice at 79 years of age  :)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on October 20, 2022, 11:09:23 PM
World Famous Aviator, Grahame-White, Personally Denies He's Dead
As fellow forumite torbiorn noted yesterday, one can't always trust what one reads in the paper!
(from the Easton Free Press, 20 October 1915):

(https://i.imgur.com/dOPtVro.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: KiwiZac on October 21, 2022, 05:30:33 AM
I love stuff like this  ;D
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on October 21, 2022, 11:16:51 PM
American Aviator James Doolittle Killed in Action
This headline is actually true... but who knew there were two?  Here are excerpts from a lengthy obituary of the seldom-remembered James R. Doolittle, who flew with the Escadrille de La Fayette in France.  He was unrelated to the legendary James H. Doolittle of WWII fame who also flew for the U.S. during WWI (though not overseas).
(from the Brooklyn Daily Eagle, 20 October 1918):

(https://i.imgur.com/XgggiS0.png).(https://i.imgur.com/1mQfhJQ.png).(https://i.imgur.com/QqZgK1Q.png).(https://i.imgur.com/lwEzLgf.png).(https://i.imgur.com/ki7WXPN.png).(https://i.imgur.com/5Di10a7.png).(https://i.imgur.com/dLyH0yB.png).(https://i.imgur.com/IqrixMR.png).
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on October 23, 2022, 05:04:24 AM
'Guynemer' Falls 10,000 Feet
Another dubious war story here. Gotta say, that sure looks like René Fonck to me... I suppose they read whatever news they could get back then in Tombstone, Arizona.  I wonder if there are any valid recollections confirming this event actually happened.
(from the Tombstone Epitaph, 22 October 1916):

(https://i.imgur.com/TDEufRh.png)

Check out forum member Will Levesley's 1/72nd-scale Eduard build of Guynemer's Nieuport Ni-17 of Escadrille N.3 from 1916:
https://forum.ww1aircraftmodels.com/index.php?topic=13241.msg246606#msg246606
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on October 24, 2022, 12:08:43 AM
Completes Call of Duty in Crippled Aircraft
(from the Detroit Times, 23 October 1916):

(https://i.imgur.com/QiOi2y6.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on October 25, 2022, 12:05:41 AM
Spotlight: The German Air King
Two articles, exactly one year apart, spotlight the legendary ace and pioneering tactician Oswald Boelcke. The first describes one of his double-victory days (possibly 16 October 1916), at the point when Boelcke was the world's leading ace.  The second article retrospectively reveals a reputed relic from Boelcke's plane... though his Albatros was primarily wooden and the spelling of his name differs from his signature.
(respectively from the the Hawaiian Gazette and the Evening Star, 24 October 1916/1917):

(https://i.imgur.com/RorUhKb.png).(https://i.imgur.com/RIciFiL.png)


Check out forum member crouthaj's 1/32nd-scale build of Boelke's Albatros D.II, c. autumn 1916: https://forum.ww1aircraftmodels.com/index.php?topic=11269.0
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on October 25, 2022, 10:05:40 PM
"Bird Friend of Bird-Men"
Interesting glimpse of a Lewis gun mounted diagonally from the starboard side of the cockpit.
(from Illustrated War News, 25 October 1916):

(https://i.imgur.com/VYMGZ8N.jpg)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on October 27, 2022, 01:04:21 AM
"You Are Going Out to Inflict Death, Not Avoid It"
Here's an account on flying and gunnery tactics, including one of the earliest written uses I've yet seen of the phrase 'Hun in the Sun'.
(from the Morning Leader, 26 October 1918):

(https://i.imgur.com/oTRiCUs.png)(https://i.imgur.com/ea9Kmpw.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on October 28, 2022, 03:47:33 PM
War Progress in Flying (pt.1)
Here's the first installment of two articles by Karl/Carl Dienst, whose writing on aviation began in the 1890s
(from Popular Mechanics, October 1916):

(https://i.imgur.com/7SMvRjt.png).(https://i.imgur.com/msuIilt.png)

Check out forum member dirk's 2012 1/32nd-scale WNW build of a similar presentation F.E.2b as illustrated above: https://forum.ww1aircraftmodels.com/index.php?topic=962.msg14317#msg14317
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on October 29, 2022, 11:26:48 AM
War Progress in Flying (pt.2)
Second installment of two articles by aviation writer Karl/Carl Dienst.
(from Popular Mechanics, October 1916):

(https://i.imgur.com/Zs2JJ45.png).(https://i.imgur.com/BBbdGnW.png)

Noticing the flock of Royal Aircraft Factory birds in the last image, check out Mike Norris' recent 1/32nd Lukgraph build of B.E.2c 2635: https://forum.ww1aircraftmodels.com/index.php?topic=13001.0
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on October 29, 2022, 11:42:39 PM
Aviator Almost Kills Kaiser
(from the Albuquerque Morning Journal, 29 October 1916):

(https://i.imgur.com/bTutl2j.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on October 31, 2022, 02:40:13 AM
'Father' of German Air Force Falls
Oswald Boelcke's name again spans multiple headlines this month as news of his demise over the Western Front immediately spread.  The 25-year-old died ironically not from enemy gunfire but from a mid-air collision with his best friend- fellow ace Erwin Böhme (who survived).  Boelcke's fate reminded me of our recent article announcing Fritz Rumey's death, which was also caused by collision (with British ace G.E.B. Lawson) rather than gunfire.  This got me wondering how many of the Deutsche Luftstreitkräfte's top flyers were actually killed by enemy guns during the Great War.  A quick survey of wikipedia's 'List of World War I flying aces from Germany', suggests that this happened to only three of Germany's top twenty (Richtofen, Voss and Müller)... a remarkable statistic.  Oswald Boelcke's influence on the history of aerial combat is epic (despite the last article's headline erroneously dubbing him as merely a 'one-time elevator man').  Many of the tactics enshrined in his 'Dicta Boelcke' endure today.
(respectively from the Lakeland Evening Telegram, the Tonopah Daily Bonanza, the Daily Gate City, Constitution, and the New York Sun; 30 October 1916):

(https://i.imgur.com/8e9BOhc.png)
(https://i.imgur.com/EuZfh97.png). (https://i.imgur.com/av5LBcF.png)
(https://i.imgur.com/szUc3gp.png). (https://i.imgur.com/udGP8E6.png)

Check out forum member Kreston's 1/32-scale vignette depicting Boelcke (by Model Cellar): https://forum.ww1aircraftmodels.com/index.php?topic=7707.msg141784#msg141784
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on October 31, 2022, 08:18:40 PM
Action Over Land and Sea
(from the Arizona Republic, 31 October 1918):

(https://i.imgur.com/YMkpeXy.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on November 01, 2022, 10:46:35 PM
Italian Ace Injured
Anyone ever heard of this signore?  The closest match from the Bongionvanni Commisison List of Italian aces that I could deduce is Alessandro Buzio, who was injured during the Battle of the Piave River during a ground accident in the Summer of 1918, though he is listed as having flown with 76a Squadiglia.
(from the Telegraph-Herald, 1 November 1918):

(https://i.imgur.com/XVxeUR6.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on November 02, 2022, 10:50:40 PM
Feeling Lonely at Altitude?
No problem, simply 'switch off your engine... for a talk"!
(from the Fargo Forum, 2 November 1919):

(https://i.imgur.com/QNasggK.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on November 03, 2022, 11:24:32 PM
American Squadron 'Fights' for Freedom... and New Swimming Pool
This full-page advertisement was placed on this day in 1918 by the airmen at Taylor Field, which was the first military flying facility in the state of Alabama (established in late 1917 after the US joined the conflict).  The purpose of this 'greatest exhibit of flying ever witnessed in the South' was to raise funds not for war bonds but rather... to build themselves a 'badly needed' pool.  Alas, the Armistice would occur just five days before this great 'Aerial Circus' was to be held, presumably dashing their noble dream.  Just five months later, in April 1919, the airfield was shut down.

It would seem that these aspiring aviators neither got the chance to fly overseas nor take a collective plunge at home before the war was called off... however, the wikipedia entry on Taylor Field notes: "All the former hangars and structures of the military airfield have been torn down, though the remnants of a swimming pool remain"!
(from the Birmingham Age Herald, 3 November 1918):

(https://i.imgur.com/62VUbit.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on November 05, 2022, 01:23:13 AM
Boelcke's Burial: Brits Honor Enemy While Comrade Swears Revenge
Despite the British having sent a wreath for Boelcke's casket, this graveside cry was allegedly uttered by Hermann von der Lieth-Thomsen, the commanding general of the Deutsche Luftstreitkräfte, and winner of the Pour le Merite, even though he was not directly involved in air combat. Leith-Thomsen's son was already a POW having been shot down over England.  Clearly he never forgot this oath, since he served the Nazis in WWII as General der Flieger, even though by that time he had gone blind.
(respectively from the New York Sun and the New Britain Herald, 4 November 1916):

(https://i.imgur.com/WrJ6yqM.png).(https://i.imgur.com/99UGR4x.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on November 06, 2022, 12:29:16 AM
'Prince of Pilots'
This spotlight on maverick French ace Charles Nungesser mentions little and misspells his name, though it does succinctly summarize his two renowned traits: an accumulation of accolades and a penchant for pain.  Regarding the latter, wikipedia quotes a medical summary of his many wounds:

"Skull fracture, brain concussion, internal injuries (multiple), five fractures of the upper jaw, two fractures of lower jaw, piece of anti-aircraft shrapnel imbedded [sic] in right arm, dislocation of knees (left and right), re-dislocation of left knee, bullet wound in mouth, bullet wound in ear, atrophy of tendons in left leg, atrophy of muscles in calf, dislocated clavicle, dislocated wrist, dislocated right ankle, loss of teeth, contusions too numerous to mention."

Yet he never stopped flying.  Nine years after this article was published, Nungesser was last seen flying westward over Ireland in a failed attempt to cross the Atlantic... just two weeks before the American Charles Lindberg achieved his triumphant 'Lindy Hop' in the opposite direction.
(from the Evening Star, 5 November 1916):
(https://i.imgur.com/hQ2r7bY.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on November 07, 2022, 03:45:39 AM
British Airmen Rescue Fallen Flier Then Traverse Egyptian Desert
Here's an interesting tale from the lesser-known Sinai & Palestine campaign of the Middle Eastern Theatre involving a daring flight by No. 30 Squadron, RFC following the bombing of a Turkish airfield.  I'm guessing this was achieved in a Royal Aircraft Factory B.E. variant, though I'm not certain.
(from the Anchorage Daily Times, 6 November 1916):

(https://i.imgur.com/tU4aWtu.png)

As a bonus, from the AWM archives, here's the view of the aerodrome at Kantara, Ismailia (El Qantara today) that these three airmen would likely have seen upon their return, along with a view inside their repair hangar:
(https://i.imgur.com/QmzCZMt.jpg) (https://i.imgur.com/z25Ysp2.jpg)

And from a 1/72-scale perspective, here's a build of mine depicting a converted B.E.2b sent to join No.30 Squadron in Ismailia, Egypt, where it was operated against the Turks in defense of the Suez Canal throughout 1915.  I recall my 'diorama' was another low-budget affair comprising some brown fabric draped over a cardboard box and sprinkled with a mix of curry and mustard powder with a pinch dried fennel.
(https://i.imgur.com/ZJCr7uLl.jpg) . (https://i.imgur.com/pSrrbiMl.jpg)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on November 07, 2022, 03:28:31 PM
Pigeons, Chickens and Crows Employed As Aerial Early-Warning System
(from the Spokesman-Review, 7 November 1915):

(https://i.imgur.com/AhWi5yF.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on November 09, 2022, 12:07:04 PM
Trouble and Triumph Through Twenty-One Thousand Feet
The unnamed aviator noted in this almost-unbelievable combat story must be none other than William George Barker, the "most decorated war hero in the History of Canada, the British Empire, and the Commonwealth of Nations" (according the plaque on his tomb).  The legendary dogfight tore up the sky over the Western Front on 27 October 1918.  It resulted in Barker 'single-handedly' earning the Victoria Cross, though it took him months to recover from his grave injuries.  Ironically, Barker, like several other Great War aces reported on here, died not during combat, but from a simple flying accident.
(from The Sun, 8 November 1918):

(https://i.imgur.com/AzAdTR5.png) (https://i.imgur.com/f2ptEK9.png)

And here's a modern recollection excerpted from acepilots.com:

"He took off in his Snipe, #E8102, started for England... Over Bois de Marmal, he first encountered a Rumpler 'C' two-seat recon plane. Its skillful pilot and observer/gunner kept him at bay, and the gunner hit Barker's Snipe. Eventually Barker circled away and, relying on his accurate gunnery, fired from 200 yards, killing the gunner. He quickly scored more hits on the now-vulnerable Rumpler, breaking it up in the air.  But in his focus on his victim, he missed a Fokker that got behind him. The Fokker's gunfire smashed into his right leg. Although badly injured, Barker was able to get into a circling contest, which only ended when his bullets struck the Fokker's gas tank, setting the plane afire.

At this moment, Barker's... found himself in the midst of a flight of Fokker and Albatros biplanes patrolling at high altitude. Spandau guns opened up from every direction and another bullet smashed into his other leg. Somehow, he managed to shoot down two of these opponents before he fainted and went into a diving spin. The rush of air revived him and he came to, still in the midst of German fighters. As they all fired at him, he selected one opponent and flew right at him, guns firing. As they closed, he blew it apart and then realized that his left elbow had been hit too.

Virtually crippled, with three limbs shattered, he passed out again. For a second time, he revived amidst enemy aircraft, now quite low. Incredibly, he dispatched another DVII. As he struggled to reach the safety of the British lines, a German bullet struck his gas tank. Luckily, it didn't catch fire and Billy switched over to reserve. Seconds later, the Snipe crash-landed, skidding sideways and then flipping over. The men of a Scottish infantry regiment, who had witnessed his epic aerial battle, pulled him from the wreckage... Barker had claimed another six victories."

Check out forum member Will Levesley's 1/72 Eastern Express build of Barker's Sopwith Snipe that also survived this legendary dogfight: https://forum.ww1aircraftmodels.com/index.php?topic=12998.msg242497#msg242497
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on November 10, 2022, 01:26:57 AM
Machine Gun Duel
In contrast to yesterday's news chronicling perhaps the last great aerial battle from the last few weeks of the war, here's an article from 1914, when the conflict was just a few months underway and aerial combat was still somewhat of an uncodified novelty.  This duel involved the legendary aviation pioneer Louis Paulhan who taught himself to fly in 1909 an was among the first ten Frenchmen to obtain a pilot's license.
(from the Brattleboro Daily Reformer, 9 November 1914):

(https://i.imgur.com/exwLgQN.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on November 11, 2022, 02:15:08 PM
American Aviation Pioneer Falls Flying For Russia
He flew the plane from which the first parachute jump was made (March 1912).  He was the world's first airline airplane pilot (January 1914).  He test-piloted the prototype Curtiss 'Jenny' (July 1915).  And for a year Tony Jannus was stationed in Sevastopol training Russian pilots how to fly... until he plunged into the Black Sea when his Curtiss H-7 suffered engine trouble on 12 October 1916.  His body was never found.

Since 1963, the Tony Jannus Award for 'outstanding achievement in scheduled air transportation' has been awarded annually; past recipients include Eddie Rickenbacker, Jimmy Doolittle, Chuck Yaeger, Richard Branson and Captain Sulley (hero of the 'Miracle on the Hudson').
(from the Fayette Falcon, 10 November 1916; badass image ℅ wikipedia):

(https://i.imgur.com/Vmo4RDz.png)  (https://i.imgur.com/vKoQu48.jpg)

Check out this 1/48 scale Lindberg build of a Curtiss Jenny shared by forum member ermeio:  https://forum.ww1aircraftmodels.com/index.php?topic=6106.msg111180#msg111180
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on November 12, 2022, 02:53:16 AM
Good News / Bad News
From the same front page of Frank Luke's home-state newspaper we're given two exciting headlines. First, revelation that the World War is over.  We're also informed that Luke, who was America's second-highest-scoring ace in their Expeditionary Force, has been awarded the Medal of Honor.  Luke was one of only thirteen aviators to earn 'ace in a day' status during the conflict. America's top ace, Eddie Rickenbacker would note (℅ wikipedia):

"He was the most daring aviator and greatest fighter pilot of the entire war. His life is one of the brightest glories of our Air Service. He went on a rampage and shot down fourteen enemy aircraft, including ten balloons, in eight days. No other ace, even the dreaded Richthofen, had ever come close to that."

Amazingly, though Luke had been killed in action back and buried by the Germans back in September, he was still being erroneously reported as missing by the American press.  This article suggests he was being held prisoner.  The full story of Luke's legendary last flight would not be revealed for another week or two.

In this same article, we also told of a war medal going a few other notables, including the Italian nationalist poet Gabriele D'Annunzio, who made his now-famous 1200-kilometer 'Flight over Vienna' (in an Ansaldo SVA) to drop 50,000 copies of his own propaganda poem. More on that story here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flight_over_Vienna

(from the Arizona Republican, 11 November 1918):

(https://i.imgur.com/A6EkILw.png)
(https://i.imgur.com/CnEeJ0W.png)


Check out forum member Mike Norris' 1/32 scale Hobbycraft build of Luke's Spad S.XIII: https://forum.ww1aircraftmodels.com/index.php?topic=9691.0

And here's forum member xan's 1/48 scale Ansaldo SVA: https://forum.ww1aircraftmodels.com/index.php?topic=12846.msg239482#msg239482

Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on November 13, 2022, 01:19:46 AM
Saved by Whiskey and Soda
Who knows what is fact or fiction in this article, but it's a great tale of how the La Fayette Escadrille was spared from annihilation by a Gotha raid during the supposed first attack on the American flag on the Western Front.  'Whisky' and 'Soda' were, of course, the two famous lion-cub mascots belonging to the squadron. I wonder if anyone has ever written about all the wonderful Great War Mascots?  Sargeant Stubby is my personal favorite.
(from the South Bend News-Times, 12 November 1917):

(https://i.imgur.com/Nh0tzzT.png) (https://i.imgur.com/fLJgD1t.png) (https://i.imgur.com/k4UBXIz.jpg)

Check out this blurb on Whiskey and Soda from a website for the recent documentary film, which includes a trailer: https://thelafayetteescadrille.org/whiskey-soda
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on November 14, 2022, 03:00:54 AM
Three Volleys for the Dead
The demise of the German ace Kurt Wintgens was reported here a few weeks back. Today's headline covers his dramatic burial; which, per the flyer's request, occurred near as possible to where he fell.  Hundreds attended.  Wreaths were dropped by air.  Several Blue-Max recipients joined the funeral procession, including: Ernst Freiherr von Althaus, Walter Höhndorf, Hans-Joachim Buddecke, and Wilhelm Frankl.  Within eighteen months all but Althaus (who ceased flying in 1917) would also be dead in the ground.
(from the Clarksburg Daily Telegram, 13 November 1916):

(https://i.imgur.com/sYtsKoC.png)
(https://i.imgur.com/IT2bxBA.png)

I couldn't find any completed examples for Wintgen's plane in the forum, but here member rhallinger's 1/32 WNW scale build of Buddecke's Fokker E.III: https://forum.ww1aircraftmodels.com/index.php?topic=11986.msg226157#msg226157
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on November 15, 2022, 09:39:11 AM
Brit Grabs Bullet Out of the Sky
Probably another tall tale today, though still a fun read.
(from the Smyrna Times, 14 Nov 1917):

(https://i.imgur.com/izlwF0E.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on November 16, 2022, 12:44:31 AM
'Supremely Grotesque... Riotous Orgy'
Here's what reads like a snobbish art critic's opinion of German camouflage schemes.
(from Popular Mechanics, November 1917):

(https://i.imgur.com/6q5xIMQ.png). (https://i.imgur.com/j1Z3tc7.png)

And for your viewing pleasure here's a 'fantastic kaleidoscopic' Albatros by forum member drdave (1/32 scale WNW): https://forum.ww1aircraftmodels.com/index.php?topic=11844.msg220661#msg220661
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on November 17, 2022, 12:49:43 AM
Inside a Gotha Gun Tunnel
(from Popular Science, November 1917):

(https://i.imgur.com/vakdc4g.png)

Check out forum member ClayMore Guy's 1/48 build of a Gotha G.IV which features a good view of the gun tunnel:  https://forum.ww1aircraftmodels.com/index.php?topic=12767.msg237877#msg237877
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on November 17, 2022, 03:57:40 PM
Clearly this reporter is all mixed up, but here's a little profile on the Caudron R.4, with an early example of nose art.  Apparently no one on the forum has posted a build of this machine...  another under-appreciated plane!
(from the Meridian Times, 17 November 1917):

(https://i.imgur.com/01usgbZ.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: KiwiZac on November 18, 2022, 05:55:37 AM
A Great War Caudron with a fuselage? Heresy!  ;D
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on November 19, 2022, 12:57:58 AM
Night-Fighting Farman
Alas, despite being on a few wish lists, this seems to be another airplane that no one has posted a build on the forum!
(from Popular Mechanics, November 1917):

(https://i.imgur.com/1ARmYq9.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: torbiorn on November 19, 2022, 03:17:14 AM
«Signal rockets»? Those are le Prieur rockets aren’t they? Maybe the journalists were just guessing or asked to write that.

And yes, tempting subject.
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on November 19, 2022, 12:00:16 PM
«Signal rockets»? Those are le Prieur rockets aren’t they? Maybe the journalists were just guessing or asked to write that..

I do believe, yes!
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on November 19, 2022, 03:13:35 PM
Thirty Aces Killed
(from the Flushing Daily Times, 19 November 1917):

(https://i.imgur.com/aT3Y8al.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on November 21, 2022, 11:58:56 PM
Attacked By 'Arrows'
Here's a article on the early use of French flechettes.  Ongoing use of such anti-personnel ballistic weapons remains controversial today.  For more insight and images, here's a relatively recent article on WWI flechettes from The Vintage News:  https://www.thevintagenews.com/2018/03/03/the-flechettes/?chrome=1
(from the Daily Capital Journal, 20 November 1914)

(https://i.imgur.com/JJPmPRT.png). (https://i.imgur.com/agjyMh0.png). (https://i.imgur.com/dQcCnfF.png)

Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on November 22, 2022, 11:06:18 AM
Zero Becomes Hero When Clumsy Chump KO's Champ
(from Popular Mechanics, November 1917):

(https://i.imgur.com/YkmZe46.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on November 23, 2022, 10:50:52 PM
Extra Horsepower Required For Desert Crossing
Here's a lonely B.E.2c making its way across Egypt.
(from the Illustrated War News, 22 November 1916):

(https://i.imgur.com/2WfGSti.jpg).(https://i.imgur.com/z25gq5Q.jpg)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: KiwiZac on November 24, 2022, 06:00:37 AM
Lonely? It's got lots of friends!  ;D

So. Who's going to build a dio of this with the Roden - or LukGraph! - kit?
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on November 24, 2022, 10:48:05 AM
Lonely? It's got lots of friends!  ;D  So. Who's going to build a dio of this with the Roden - or LukGraph! - kit?

Haha, true!  There are so many diorama-worthy photos of WW1 planes in transit our there.  This one's a good candidate:

(https://i.imgur.com/dx6yebV.jpg)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on November 24, 2022, 11:07:31 AM
Titanic Triplane
Here's a full-page feature on Italy's Caproni Ca.41 bomber.  About fifty of these things were produced.  Alas, this seems another plane which has yet to appear in model form here on the forum.
(from Popular Scinece, November 1917):

(https://i.imgur.com/WRSGyJ9.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on November 26, 2022, 12:54:52 AM
Slinging and Signaling Seaplanes
Following upon a news article here from August, here's a good view of a Short Admiralty Type 184 being slung from the deck of a British Royal Navy seaplane tender (Ben-My-Chree maybe?).
(from the New York Tribune, 25 November 1917):

(https://i.imgur.com/M2JUutk.png)

Check forum member IanB's 1/72 Aeroclub build of a folded Short 184:  https://forum.ww1aircraftmodels.com/index.php?topic=6956.msg127811#msg127811
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on November 27, 2022, 05:45:46 AM
"...Such a Splendid Cause"
Frank Luke recently made headlines here (back on the 11th) when news of his disappearance reached the press on the same day the armistice was signed.  However, it was not until this day in 1918 when his death was formally acknowledged in Luke's homestate paper.  It was another front-page story, for Luke, the son of a Prussian immigrant, was already a locally renowned hero.  This article itemizes his remarkable string of victories that spanned the last few weeks of his 'splendid cause'.
(from the Arizona Republican 26 November 1918):

(https://i.imgur.com/m3WFBpV.png)
(https://i.imgur.com/5NfujdV.png). (https://i.imgur.com/KpyWVFv.png). (https://i.imgur.com/VP28Sou.png)

Check out forum member gomidefilho's 1/100th paper-card model of Luke's SPAD 13C1:  https://forum.ww1aircraftmodels.com/index.php?topic=9142.msg166587#msg166587
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on November 28, 2022, 12:23:34 AM
Works Overtime, Earns Bonus
This article recounts how British airman Albert Ball was simultaneously awarded the Distinguished Service Order with Bar for multiple same-day engagements flying multiple planes morning and evening against hostile aircraft.  In one attack he reputedly broke up a formation of Roland C.IIs using Le Prieur rockets intended for observation balloons. At this time, during the fall of 1916, Ball was Britain's top-scoring ace with 31 victories.  He was subsequently sent on leave to the homefront where he was hailed a national hero.
(from the Sydney Morning Herald, 27 November 1916):

(https://i.imgur.com/09PakgC.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on November 29, 2022, 01:35:51 PM
One-Legged Officer Flies For Germany
There's an 'eindekker' joke in here somewhere...
(from the Richmond Times-Dispatch, 28 November 1918):

(https://i.imgur.com/U0qJPGx.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on November 29, 2022, 11:41:30 PM
Over the Front
This simple article from the sixteen-month-old war unwittingly touches upon all the aspects that make this microcosm of WWI aviation such an interesting history to study: the evolution of fighting tactics in a wager for month-by-month supremacy, the introduction of new technology in real time, the race for more powerful engines, ever-increasing firepower, adaptive ingenuity in the field, plus the individual struggle of man vs. man (and sometimes man vs. machine).
(from the Hickory Daily Record, 29 November 1915):

(https://i.imgur.com/m5wmPbA.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: KiwiZac on November 30, 2022, 06:33:55 AM
A fascinating story, but is it true? Or, rather, is the name correct as a quick Google search comes up with nothing.
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on November 30, 2022, 11:23:33 PM
A fascinating story, but is it true? Or, rather, is the name correct as a quick Google search comes up with nothing.

Are you referring to the one-legged flyer?  Names (particularly foreign ones) were indeed commonly misspelled in these old articles. I also scanned google with no success... I don't readily have access to German newspapers so didn't investigate further.  There was a 1916 article back in May on Theodore Marburg Jr., an American aviator who lost a leg in action then became a flying instructor (though he didn't return to combat), so perhaps there's potential to this story.  For now I'm leaving it in the 'questionable' category!
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on November 30, 2022, 11:45:36 PM
"One never knows when one goes up when or where or how one may descend"
Following yesterday's synopsis on conditions above the Western Front, here's a good read from a German perspective over the Eastern Front, namely Galicia (now largely Ukraine).  One takeaway here seems to parallel themes from future conflicts - that there never a shortage of men but rather materiel.  Though clearly a pilot is always kept busy, this observer astonishingly admits to having it so easy being unopposed in the sky he brings a novel aboard to pass the time!
(from the Daily Gate City, 30 November 1915):

(https://i.imgur.com/hnIHyRt.png). (https://i.imgur.com/vEmFQtd.png). (https://i.imgur.com/Kwn4sLb.png)
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: KiwiZac on December 01, 2022, 08:20:03 AM
A fascinating story, but is it true? Or, rather, is the name correct as a quick Google search comes up with nothing.
Are you referring to the one-legged flyer? 
Sorry, yes!
Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on December 01, 2022, 10:41:59 PM
World's First Female Military Pilot Heads to the Front
And this wasn't even the first war she volunteered for.  While Princess Eugenie Mikhailovna Shakhovskaya wasn't Russia's first female 'aviatress' (that credit goes to Lydia Zvereva) she was an early bird, having first flown in 1911. Her public offer to serve as a pilot in the Italo-Turkish War of 1911-1912 (the first conflict to involve aircraft in combat) was twice denied but when the Great War erupted Shakhovskaya again appealed... which brings us to today's news.  Evidently her request was approved by Tsar Nicholas II (her cousin), who assigned her to the aviation detachment of Kovno Fortress (now Kaunas, Lithuania). 

From here Shakhovskaya's story goes sideways.  Reputedly she was shortly thereafter dismissed from active service, accused of being a spy, arrested, and sentenced to death.  Tsar Nicholas apparently intervened again and Shakhovskaya's sentence was commuted to life in prison. Freed during the revolution, she then supposedly became a member of the newly formed Soviet secret-police organization Cheka.  She is said to have become addicted to narcotics, possibly deriving from pain-killers prescribed pursuant to plane crash she survived in 1912, which killed her instructor and rumored lover Vsevolod Abramovich (pictured asider her below).  By 1920 Shakhovskaya was dead.  Some reports claim she was killed in an opium-fueled gunfight with a colleague. 
(respectively from the Evening Public Ledger and the Bridgeport Evening Farmer, 1 December 1914):

(https://i.imgur.com/VaX1DRK.png). (https://i.imgur.com/IYa86Ed.png)

More details about this pioneer aviator's short but dramatic life (which aided today's backstory) can be found here on Aerotime Hub: https://www.aerotime.aero/articles/27441-Princess-spy-aviatress-the-life-of-Evgeniya-Shakhovskaya

And if anyone cares to revisit, here's a link to our earlier snippet on Nedeshda Degtereva, the first female aviator to be wounded in combat: https://forum.ww1aircraftmodels.com/index.php?topic=12930.msg245511#msg245511

Title: Re: On this Day (WWI aviation news)
Post by: PJ Fisher on December 02, 2022, 03:01:16 PM
Tom Gunn: China's Top Gun
San-Francisco-born Tan Gen (commonly called Tom Gunn), became the first Chinese-American aviator when he began flying 1911.  By the summer of 1912, Gunn was flying demonstrations for the public including military officials of the newly born Republic of China; which, in 1915, would offer him a captain's commission to head their Air Force. Interspersed with stints in Honolulu and Manila over the next two years, Gunn is said to have made more than 800 flights and carried more than 300 passengers in the Pacific region.  Today's news article, similar to yesterday's tale of Princess Shakhovskaya, echoes the shifting tides of revolutionary politics as Gunn somehow found himself out of official favor and with a bounty on his head.  Tan Gen reportedly remained a target for assassination and was killed in a suspicious 'rickshaw accident' in 1925.
(from the New-York Tribune, 2 December 1917):

(https://i.imgur.com/iWSt7dt.png)
A few more details on Tom Gunn's life can be read on warbirdsnews: https://warbirdsnews.com/aviation-museum-news/tom-gunn-exhibit-pacific-aviation-museum.html